National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

Costlier oil likely means higher prices for air travel

Jun 5, 2018

Every time we pull into a gas station, we see the effect of rising global oil prices. Airlines are getting a bit of sticker shock, too, when they fill their planes with jet fuel. Crude oil is up close to 50 percent in the past year, which is likely to cut into profits and lead to fare hikes.

Correction (June 5, 2018): The original version of this radio story misidentified the affiliation of analyst Jim Corridore. He works for CFRA Research. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

What "old" technology are you hoping will make a comeback?

Jun 5, 2018

Got any old technology that you're still nostalgic about?

(U.S. Edition) The GOP tax law requires companies to pay a "repatriation tax" of about 15 percent on overseas profits, and is aimed at big multinationals like Apple and Google. But on today's show, we'll look at one  group that's unexpectedly getting impacted by this measure: small businesses. Afterwards, we'll look at what the rise in crude oil prices means for the airline industry, and then we'll talk about how one Ohio area is renovating a home as an example to encourage young people to renovate their own.

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … For the first time in two years, the British government has sold off another chunk of its stake in the Royal Bank of Scotland. But unwinding its financial-crisis era measures comes at a hefty cost for taxpayers. Then, anti-austerity protests are expected to continue for a sixth night in Jordan as people there rally against a new International Monetary Fund-backed tax bill. Afterwards, starting this month, Google has banned cryptocurrency ads from its platform.

Apple's WWDC: Lots of new features, little talk of privacy

Jun 5, 2018

Apple CEO Tim Cook hasn’t been shy in recent weeks about taking shots at Facebook over user privacy. So it was reasonable to think that privacy and social responsibility might be selling points at its Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC) in San Jose this week. But the issue was barely mentioned by Cook or anyone else for that matter. Ina Fried, chief technology correspondent at Axios, spoke with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about whether Apple missed an opportunity.

Apple CEO Tim Cook hasn’t been shy in recent weeks about taking shots at Facebook over user privacy. So it was reasonable to think that privacy and social responsibility might be selling points at its Worldwide Developer’s Conference (WWDC) in San Jose this week. But the issue was barely mentioned by Cook or anyone else for that matter. Ina Fried, the chief technology correspondent at Axios, spoke with Marketplace Tech host Molly Wood about whether Apple missed an opportunity. (06/05/2018)

What’s driving the global steel glut?

Jun 4, 2018

For all the current disagreements on trade between the U.S. and China, there's one thing that everyone agrees on. The world is producing too much steel. There's overcapacity. So, why are we awash with steel? And what can be done about it?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Breaking into the hyper-competitive K-pop music industry is notoriously brutal. But what if you’re a foreigner — and gay?

Meet Marshall Bang, better known to audiences as MRSHLL. He’s a Korean American singer from Orange County, California, who's trying to conquer South Korea’s music scene with his rich, chocolatey voice, and at the same time upend its culturally conservative mores. 

As the steel tariff exemption process drags on, optimism wanes

Jun 4, 2018

The last time we talked to Charles Smith, the process of applying for an exemption from the 25 percent steel tariff President Donald Trump imposed in March had just begun. He was optimistic about his application.

The Chinese electronics giant ZTE finds itself in the middle of U.S.-China tariff and trade war tensions. The controversy is complex, involving trade sanction violations, punishment by the U.S. government and the surprise intervention of President Donald Trump to try to save the firm. But at its core — its technology core — a look inside the internal parts of a ZTE phone reveal a broader critical backdrop of China’s place in the electronics value chain, where it wants to go and what it’s willing to spend to become a world leader.

Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin got the cold shoulder at the G-7 finance ministers meeting this past weekend, and as President Donald Trump heads to Quebec for more meetings, Canada, Mexico and the European Union are issuing blistering responses to his tariffs. We'll kick off today's show looking at the potential political costs and economic benefits of all this. Then: We'll take apart a bunch of big tech stories from today — and see what you can learn about our relationship with the Chinese by literally taking apart a ZTE phone.

CNN’s marketing for its new show “Cuomo Prime Time” features veteran journalist Chris Cuomo in a suit and tie, talking directly to viewers: “Forget about the spin,” he says. “This is about how we got here.” The live one-hour nightly program, which starts airing tonight, is being marketed as offering in-depth, one-on-one interviews with Washington bigwigs and key players abroad. It is designed to help the network, which is trailing its rivals Fox News and MSNBC in audience ratings for the coveted prime-time evening hours. 

(Markets Edition) Trade talks between the U.S. and China have ended without any agreements. On today's show, we'll take a brief look at some of the sticking points in their negotiations and some of the threats that they've lobbed at one another. Afterwards, we'll discuss Apple's plan to launch a series of tools that might help people spend less time on their phones, and then we'll discuss a new study that finds the GOP tax law actually led some companies to contribute more to defined-benefit pension plans. (06/04/2018)

An unintended consequence of the GOP tax law: bigger pensions for some

Jun 4, 2018

Because of the new tax law, many companies got more serious about saving for retirement last year.

According to a new study from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the GOP tax bill likely led some companies to increase their defined-benefit pension contributions in 2017. 

Apple kicks off its Worldwide Developers Conference in San Jose today. One of the things the tech giant is reportedly going to be rolling out is a series of tools that may help you spend less time on your phone ... or at least be aware of how much time you’re spending. What does that mean for a company that normally wants you to be glued to your devices?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

For many lower-income families, the cost of private school tuition can seem out of reach. But a nationwide network of private schools has found a way to help subsidize that cost. The program only accepts students below the poverty line as part of a unique model of work-for-tuition. In Atlanta, students work at a business one day a week, and in return, over 100 metro Atlanta companies cover 60 percent of the students’ education costs.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

The changing economics of health care

Jun 4, 2018

(U.S. Edition) New research from the New England Journal of Medicine finds that many breast cancer patients may not need chemotherapy at all. On today's show, we'll explore the publication's findings, and what avoiding chemotherapy can mean for a patient's health and their finances. Afterwards, we'll discuss the high costs associated with new cancer drugs and who ends up footing the bill, and then we'll look at how one Catholic organization has come up with an innovative way to make private school more affordable. (06/04/2018)

 

 

Coffee chains look to China for more buzz

Jun 4, 2018

(Global Edition) From the BBC World Service … Trade talks between the U.S. and China ended without a deal on Sunday, so are the two nations closer to a trade war? Then, a look at why farmers in India are throwing their produce, milk and cheese into the street to push the government for more assistance. Afterwards, it’s Monday, which means many of us feel like it takes a boatload of caffeine to get us going after the weekend. While not everyone in the world relies on coffee for that morning buzz, we’ll take you to China where global chains are exploring more expansion opportunities.

New novel imagines tech industry "solving" childbirth

Jun 4, 2018

Sometimes it seems like there's nothing that tech companies won't try to disrupt. The new novel "Mother of Invention" by Caeli Wolfson Widger takes that idea all the way to the womb. The book tells the story of Tessa Callahan and her biotech startup, which shortens pregnancy to just nine weeks and gets rid of some of the side effects.

Sometimes it seems like there's nothing that tech companies won't try to disrupt. The new novel "Mother of Invention" by Caeli Wolfson Widger takes that idea all the way to the womb. The book tells the story of a biotech startup that shortens pregnancy to just nine weeks ... and questions whether that's actually a good idea.

Could lava one day be used to store excess CO2?

Jun 3, 2018

Can there possibly be an upside to the disaster unfolding in Hawaii, as the Kilauea volcano continues to spew lava and ash? Certainly not right away; but perhaps in the long-term some of that lava might serve a useful purpose.

Scientists believe that solidified lava and magma could perhaps safely store large amounts of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide and help combat global warming.

New emails uncovered through a Freedom of Information Act request reveal that a US Food and Drug Administration scientist found residue from the herbicide glyphosate on nearly every food item tested, including cereals, crackers and honey.

The upcoming United Nations Climate Change Conference set to take place in Poland is a little more than six months away. The conference — also known as the 24th Conference of the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, or COP24 for short — represents the next formal opportunity for the 197 nations to continue to form a plan to go forward with the Paris climate agreement of 2015, created at COP21.

Fears of a trade war rekindled

Jun 1, 2018

What a week. We started with Italy and fears of another European debt crisis. We segued quickly into fears of a trade war. And we ended the week with a boffo jobs report. The unemployment rate has fallen to 3.8 percent, but impressive numbers aside, what’s going on with sluggish wage growth? It's not keeping up with household expenditures. Then, we discuss trade war fears that have been stoked this week. And will tariffs eat away at the benefits from the tax cuts? We break it all down with Nela Richardson from Redfin and David Gura from MSNBC. 

More of the tariff skirmishes between the U.S. and China, the EU, Mexico, Canada, and other countries are likely to end up at the World Trade Organization. That's because the WTO is supposed to help mediate trade battles. The problem is, President Donald Trump has been working to undermine the WTO's authority by vetoing all judicial appointments to the body's seven-person appeals chamber, which has final say on trade fights.

5 things you should know about women who heist

Jun 1, 2018

"Ocean's 8" hits theaters June 8, and Sandra Bullock's gang of women criminals may be fictional, but there are some real life women who ran big heists. In the 1920s, the infamous Bonnie Parker of Bonnie and Clyde hit the scene.

Other notorious thieves have made their mark: Ma Barker, who led the bank-robbing Barker Gang, and a string of more recent criminals — the Starlet Bandit, the Church Lady Bandit, the Barbie Bandits.

Why the death toll in Puerto Rico matters

Jun 1, 2018

This week, a Harvard study published in the New England Journal of Medicine estimated that at least 4,645 deaths in Puerto Rico were related to Hurricane Maria and its devastation of the U.S. territory. That's 70 times higher than official estimates.

Earlier this month, we asked listeners for questions for Ask a Manager's  Alison Green on navigating an internship. Now, as internship season approaches rapidly, she gives her best advice for how to get the most out of an internship. Below is a summary of her answers. 

What do you do about an absentee manager?

Quiz: Can you spot gendered language in job ads?

Jun 1, 2018

When employers are crafting job ads, they might already have an idea of the type of individual they want to fill their position. But these preconceived notions can lead to a “form of bias that produces more male candidates or more female candidates.

Do you think you can spot gendered language? Check out some excerpts from real job listings below and see if you can tell if they are masculine- or feminine-coded.

Two years ago, Vanessa Roanhorse was in Taos, New Mexico, with her husband, and they walked by the Kit Carson museum.

"My husband was like 'who's Kit Carson?'” says Roanhorse. “I'm looking at him thinking, ‘how do you not know who Kit Carson is?'”

Although Carson is a significant part of US history, people outside of the Southwest generally have no idea who he was. He was a frontiersman, famous as a tracker and wilderness guide and for shaping New Mexico.

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