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<a href="https://twitter.com/rpdsanescobar/status/819161154245316608" target="_blank">Twitter screenshot</a>

There is no country in the world called San Escobar.

But in the age of "fake news" let's just imagine for a moment a "fake country" called San Escobar.

Think of it as "a small country located between Mexico and Guatemala with 200,000 citizens, with several main cities, including Esperal Bay, Santo Subito, and with several major exports including tomatoes and wine," says Ewa Lalik, a technology blogger in Warsaw, Poland.

Each week on The World, we feature a unique selection of music, and every week, we put together the highlights for you here. 

YouTube-inspired music confessionals

Songwriter Teitur Lassen is from the Faroe Islands. His latest collection of songs is a collaboration with American pianist and composer Nico Muhly, and performed with the Dutch ensemble Holland Baroque. The songs were inspired by YouTube videos in which people share something unique about themselves. — Marco

Courtesy L. Somi Roy

Persia claims to be the birthplace of polo, but the modern version of the game comes from the small state of Manipur in northeastern India. The British discovered it there and brought “hockey on horseback” to the West in the 19th century. These days, the West is going back to Manipur to play polo.

Since 2013, members of the United States Polo Association have been coming to compete with Manipuris. The 2017 USPA-Manipur games get underway next week in Manipur’s capital, Imphal.

Courtesy of RAICES

When Leah Aguilera was held in a special section of the Santa Ana City Jail in California for transgender people, who were being detained by immigration officials, she experienced a delay and pushback for her request for hormones and disparaging remarks for being transgender.

“The only thing I was thinking is that I want to get out. I really want to get out,” she says. “I was getting in, like, depression. I didn’t know how long I was going to be there.”

Joshua Lott/Reuters

Last month the Justice Department announced it would end the use of private prisons at the federal level in the next five years.

Thomas Hawk/Flicker

It is illegal for women to get an abortion in Ireland unless the pregnancy directly threatens her life.

With no other options, two women live-tweeted as they traveled to the United Kingdom for the procedure.

@TwoWomenTravel live-tweeted from Friday to Sunday. The description of the Twitter account states “Two Women, one procedure, 48 hours away from home.”

Matthew Childs/Reuters

Let's turn back the clock 20 years to the Atlanta Games in 1996. There, mighty Great Britain took home just one gold medal.

This year, British athletes won 27 golds and 67 medals overall. Great Britain finished second in the gold medal count behind only the US, and third in the total medal count behind the US and China.

Andy Uhler

Dean Spanos, the billionaire who owns the Chargers, thinks getting into the Los Angeles market is going to pay off. But with the Rams in L.A. already, the Chargers won’t be the only NFL franchise in town. So will fans actually show up to games and spend money on yet another team’s gear?

Allen Sanderson, economics professor at the University of Chicago, said this move isn’t really about the Chargers or the Rams.

The Environmental Protection Agency announced today that it’s locking in car fuel efficiency standards set four years ago, in advance of the incoming Trump administration. The plan requires automakers to more than double their fleet-wide fuel efficiency by 2025. While a key part of President Obama’s legacy, the regulation is not all popular with the automobile industry.

For banks, there’s a delayed benefit to rising rates

Jan 13, 2017

Interest rates are rising, which tends to be good news for banks. But it looks like it'll take a little longer for them to see the benefits. In earnings announcements today, several big banks, including Bank of America, reported flat or only slightly higher margins on interest rates. So when can the banks expect to cash in?

Enrique de la Osa/Reuters

President Barack Obama is about to do something a sitting US president hasn't done in almost 90 years, when Calvin Coolidge was president. On Sunday, March 20, Obama will set foot on Cuban soil.

But more than many nations, the relationship between the US and Cuba is both exceptionally complicated and particularly important. There are some 1.8 million Cuban Americans, and more than 1.2 million of them live in Florida, where Cuban developments are considered local news. But for the rest of the country, the relationship with Cuba is a little more abstract.

Hayley Hershman

No matter who you are, you've probably had a rough day at the office that changed your perspective, or maybe you made an impulse purchase you really, really wish you could take back. This week, Chris Thile, the host of "A Prairie Home Companion," took our money-inspired personality questionnaire.

You can catch "A Prairie Home Companion" on your local public radio station.

Fill in the blank: Money can't buy you happiness but it can buy you ______

Lizzie O'Leary

This week, President-elect Donald Trump held his first press conference since July, and answered questions about his plans for his businesses. 

The brief gist: he says he's handing over control of the Trump Organization to his older sons and a business associate and putting his assets into a trust. Trump says no new foreign deals will be made, but new domestic deals are allowed and the President-elect can look at an overall profit and loss statement.

The changing balance of US-Russia relations

Jan 13, 2017
Lizzie O'Leary and Eliza Mills

In the past few weeks, there's been a lot of news about Russia, from the DNC hacking, to the intelligence community's conversations with President elect Trump about the Kremlin.

President Obama recently issued new sanctions against against the country, and ejected 35 Russian diplomats from the United States. 

To get a better sense of the economic and political relationships between the U.S. and Russia and what might change, Marketplace Weekend reached out to Matthew Rojansky, Director of the Kennan Institute at the Wilson Center.

01/13/2017: Business conflicts? Trump has a few

Jan 13, 2017
Marketplace

We're going long and short on private prisons and President Barack Obama's legacy as a job creator with Marketplace's Lewis Wallace and The Atlantic's Gillian White. Then, UCLA law professor Jon Michaels talks us through President-elect Donald Trump's potential conflicts of interest and Russia expert Matt Rojansky explains the economic and political relationship between the U.S. and Russia. Plus, "A Prairie Home Companion" host Chris Thile takes the Marketplace Quiz.

Globalization backlash looms over Davos forum

Jan 13, 2017
Sam Beard

The presidential inauguration may cast a pall over the World Economic Forum at Davos in the Swiss Alps next week. The vote for Donald Trump represented a stunning rejection of  some of the core beliefs propagated at Davos: a belief in the benefits of  globalization,free trade and mass immigration. Both Trump’s victory and the vote for Brexit in the United Kingdom  have been widely seen as a slap in the face for the global political and business  elite, the very people  who will gather in the Swiss ski resort. Will they feel abashed and deflated by these two electoral setbacks?  

Leigh Gallagher of Fortune and Felix Salmon of Fusion join Kai Ryssdal to discuss the week's business and economic news. This week, they debate whether the new administration will work towards heavily slowing down Congress, if President-elect Trump really is a "tweet risk" and what might be the best thing to ask Steven Mnuchin at his congressional hearing.

Kim Adams

The city of St. Louis is trying a new strategy to fight urban blight. A massive project to raze an entire neighborhood and turn it into a new campus for a government intelligence agency.

The $1.75 billion project will keep thousands of jobs in the city, but comes at the expense of a historically black community that remains skeptical of how much of the development will benefit them.

Advocates for the unbanked worry about the Trump era

Jan 13, 2017
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Nineteen year-old Roxana Mercado Rojo needed $700. She was brought to the U.S. from Bolivia as a toddler.  She’s undocumented, and decided to apply for an Obama administration program that lets people like her get temporary protection from deportation and eligibility for a work permit.  There’s a fee.  Where to get the money?

“You know, I couldn’t kinda borrow from my parents and, you know, there wasn’t anyone of trust that I can borrow from,” she said.

01/13/17: Big banks, big money

Jan 13, 2017

After the election, some of the biggest banks were able to pull in a lot of money. We'll dive into the latest market trends. Next, we'll explore complaints from the EPA that some of Fiat Chrysler's vehicles are responsible for illegal pollution. Finally, we'll talk with some political outsiders who are vying for a position in the Trump administration.

Water Wars

Jan 13, 2017

Next to the air we breathe, it’s the planet’s most precious resource: fresh water. And it’s disappearing. The world’s largest food company describes the lack of water as a looming catastrophe that is expected to play out in the coming decades. In this episode of Reveal, we look at what’s happening in places that already are running out of water.

Outsiders hope for jobs in Trump administration

Jan 13, 2017
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

David Vincent Gagne is a chief technology officer for a web development company. He's from Ormond Beach, Florida. Sergio Loya is a management consultant in Ashburn, Virginia. Gagne voted for Hillary Clinton. Loya voted for Donald Trump. But they describe themselves as political outsiders.

They both applied for jobs in the new administration. I first talked to them the week after the election.

“I think with Trump there’s a much greater chance for people that have not been in the political 'industry' to make a change in the world,” said Gagne then.

With a few banks reporting earnings Friday  — JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Bank of America — we'll take a look at banking’s prospects. The new Trump administration and a GOP-controlled Congress have said they plan to dial back Dodd-Frank and other financial regulations. For the most part, bank stocks – and the market overall — have done well in the months since the election. Rising interest rates are a help to banks, of course. But in the long run, how will things play out if the new administration removes banking and finance regulations?   

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