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To keep promises made at the Paris climate summit, Canada is rolling out a master plan to deal with climate change — including a phaseout of coal by 2030 and a phase in of carbon pricing by 2019.

At a meeting Dec. 9 in Ottawa, all of Canada’s provinces, save Saskatchewan and Manitoba, agreed to participate in a national carbon pricing program.

Secrets of the Watchtower

Dec 8, 2016

For the past two years, Reveal reporter Trey Bundy has been uncovering how the Jehovah’s Witnesses hide sexual abuse in their congregations – in fact, it’s official policy. The religion's leaders have been going to extreme lengths to keep the details from public view. On the next Reveal, we track down people who know the religion’s dark secrets.

Courtesy of Abou Farman

When artist Leonor Caraballo was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008, she naturally turned to art to expose and make sense of the illness working within her. Using a 3D printer and MRI images, Caraballo and Abou Farman, her husband and collaborator, created sculptures and jewelry in the knotted shape of her tumor. They called the project, “Object Breast Cancer.”

Emma Trim 

Growing up, author Brit Bennett attended a black protestant church with her father and separately, a mostly white, Catholic church with her mother, who is also black.

"I had these very different cultural experiences," she said. "So, I think I’ve always been interested in church as a space that can be so culturally different, even when people are professing to believe the same thing."

Rifle fire crackled over a snowy field in central Estonia, interrupted by the rhythmic thumping of a heavy machine gun. From their position on a ridge, paratroopers from the U.S. Army's 173rd Airborne Brigade opened up on the opposite tree line, as their comrades below inched toward an imaginary enemy bunker.

The foe in the exercise earlier this month was unnamed. But with the Russian border just 70 miles away, it was clear what kind of scenario was being played out.

cattalin/CC0

The word “moist” has had a hard run.

It’s been lambasted by late-night TV hosts, spurred scientific investigations into its distastefulness and topped lists of the most reviled words in American, British and Australian English. But still, moist lingers on, much maligned — and needed, for that matter. Would you really buy a box cake mix that promised a “super not-dry” cake?

cegoh/CC0

Math could use a brand ambassador. Educators are hotly debating how much math needs to be taught in schools, and recent studies have shown that our math anxiety can last well into adulthood, affecting even how our children learn the subject. Math needs a friendly face — and that’s where Eugenia Cheng comes in.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Glare of the spotlight

Nov 16, 2016

Oscar season is upon us, and one of the best picture nominees is a film that hits pretty close to home for us here at Reveal: “Spotlight.” In case you haven’t seen it yet, it’s a movie about The Boston Globe’s investigative team that exposed the Catholic church sex abuse scandal. In this hour of Reveal, we’re going to take you behind the scenes of that investigation, look at the legacy of the groundbreaking story and see how other journalists went on to expose more crimes by Catholic priests around the world.

The secret Trump voter

Nov 15, 2016

It’s over. One of the longest, craziest and most lurid elections in memory is, thankfully, over. So, now that the ballots have been cast, what were the biggest lessons learned? We cut through the noise and ask what matters most: Did democracy win on Election Day? In the first presidential race since the Supreme Court seriously weakened the Voting Rights Act, Reveal examines where the U.S. lived up to its democratic principle – and where our history of voter suppression reared its ugly head.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Billion-dollar scam

Oct 13, 2016

California’s workers’ compensation program covers 15 million workers across the state. If you get hurt on the job – fall off a ladder, for instance – it’s the system you turn to. Most employers are required to carry workers' comp insurance, which helps cover medical bills and lost wages for injured employees. But Reveal reporter Christina Jewett has discovered serious fraud in the system after reviewing thousands of documents. They show that in the last decade, more than 80 people have been accused of cheating California’s workers' comp medical system out of $1 billion.

Opal Lee, an 89-year-old woman from Fort Worth, Texas, is on a mission to make Juneteenth a nationally observed holiday.

Juneteenth, or June 19, 1865, was the day word arrived in Texas that slavery had been abolished. To bring attention to her cause, she’s on a symbolic walk to Washington.

Christopher Connelly from KERA in Dallas reports.

Reporter

Homeowners have been fleeing high-cost states like California for cheaper states like Arizona and Texas for some time, but the impact of high real estate prices is striking, according to an analysis by the company CoreLogic.

It says that for every buyer moving to California, more than two are leaving.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young speaks with Jill Schlesinger of CBS News about the latest data.

Guest

Edward Albee, author of such plays as “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf,” died on Sept. 16. He was 88.

Albee won three Tony Awards during his career — including one for lifetime achievement — as well as three Pulitzer Prizes.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young spoke with Albee in 2007 about his advice for aspiring writers and his thoughts on the future of American theater.

Guest

Edward Albee, Tony- and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright. Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Airbnb, the global home-sharing company, has begun airing ads that show how becoming an Airbnb host has changed peoples’ lives for the better.

The campaign is aimed at countering ads run by hospitality industry groups that claim Airbnb is getting rich while shrinking the local housing market, and avoiding paying taxes that the rest of the industry must pay.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with media analyst John Carroll about how the campaigns are being received.

Guest

The highly anticipated first presidential debate begins Monday at 9 p.m. ET at Hofstra University on Long Island.

While all eyes are on Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, moderator Lester Holt will share some of the spotlight. Both campaigns and the general public are curious to see how strict the NBC anchor will be when it comes to fact-checking the candidates.

NPR’s Domenico Montanaro joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to preview tonight’s debate.

The Colombian government and the rebel group known as FARC took a step toward peace Monday when they signed an accord. It’s designed to end 50 years of bloody conflict that has killed more than 220,000 people and displaced millions more.

FARC is a Marxist group, and the United States backed Colombia’s military campaign against the rebels.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd hears more about the accord and what it means from Latin America scholar Cynthia Arnson.

Guest

Robert Finley is not your average new artist.

At 63, the north Louisiana blues and soul musician has already lived a lifetime. He served as a helicopter serviceman in the Army in the ’70s and worked as a carpenter for decades until he started to lose his sight a few years ago.

Unable to continue working, Finley fell back on his dream: singing and playing guitar.

What To Do If You're Struggling To Sleep

Sep 26, 2016

Many people have trouble sleeping, at least sometimes. Symptoms of insomnia are the most common sleep disorder and affect about one third of Americans at some point in their lives.

But chronic insomnia — when trouble sleeping persists for more than a month, and alters how you feel and perform during the day — is different, and affects about 8 to 10 percent of Americans.

So what should you do when you’re having trouble sleeping?

Viewership numbers for tonight’s first presidential debate are expected to reach record-breaking levels, as Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton go head to head onstage together for the first time.

Political commentators Paris Dennard and Angela Rye join Here & Now‘s Robin Young and Peter O’Dowd to discuss what to watch for tonight.

Guests

America is experiencing an unprecedented opioid epidemic.

On average, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services says 78 people die from an opioid-related overdose every day. Prevention and treatment are key to fighting the crisis and new, innovative ideas in both areas are gaining traction in Boston after an opioid “hack-athon.”

Here & Now’s Robin Young speaks with two of the hack-athon winners, Scott Strode and Aubri Esters, about the impact they hope to have with their projects.

REVEAL Fundraiser Episode 2016

Sep 19, 2016

For the 2016 fall fundraising season, here are three of our favorite Reveal stories from this year.

Can Slow-Moving Art Disrupt Our Hectic Routines?

Sep 16, 2016

Part 6 of the TED Radio Hour episode Slowing Down

About Gabriel Barcia-Colombo's TED Talk

Early in his career, video artist Gabriel Barcia-Colombo noticed the way people breeze past works of art. He describes how his deliberate, slow-moving installations encourage people to stop and think.

About Gabriel Barcia-Colombo

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Slowing Down

About Tim Urban's TED Talk

Blogger Tim Urban explains his process of extreme procrastination in which his brain wages war between instant gratification and the moment of pure panic just before a deadline.

About Tim Urban

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

This summer, NPR's science desk is thinking about waves, of all kinds — ocean, gravitational, even stadium waves. But what is a wave, anyway? My editor asked me to puzzle that one out. And, to be honest, I was puzzled.

Is a wave a thing? Or is it the description of a thing? Or is it a mathematical formula that produces a curve that gives you the description of a thing?

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