Painting

Essential Pittsburgh
6:53 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Faked, Forgotten, Found: An Altered Renaissance Painting Revealed Through Forensics

Portrait of Isabella de’ Medici showing the 19th-century overpainting, before restoration
Carnegie Museum of Art

The Carnegie Museum of Art's current exhibition of Renaissance paintings that underwent serious forensic investigation is called Faked, Forgotten, Found.

Lulu Lippincott, the institution's Curator of Fine Arts looks at the science of art preservation and restoration, as well as the winding paths that these works have followed to Pittsburgh.

Lippincott says the museum was skeptical when they “rediscovered” a painting of Isabella de Medici while Lippincott was cleaning up the museum’s collection of art. So skeptical, in fact, they took it to be X-rayed.

What they found was outstanding. She says the X-ray revealed that the painting had been “painted over” in the Victorian era. People in that era had the wrong idea of Isabella de Medici for years.

As seen in the X-rays, Lippincott says it’s almost as though the painting was airbrushed to make de Medici look better.

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Essential Pittsburgh
8:48 pm
Thu May 9, 2013

A Rare Painting Highlights the Value of Art in Public Schools

The painting, Interieur, Lumiere De La Fenetre was hanging in a Pittsburgh Public School building for years, unpreserved.
Credit Sotheby's

For the Pittsburgh public school district, the value of art can not be over stated. Earlier this week a rare painting called "Interior, Light from the Window" by Henri Le Sidaner, donated to the district by a group called Friends of Art, was sold in auction for more than $750,000. The money will benefit the financially strapped Pittsburgh Public Schools.

For nearly a century, Friends of Art has donated more than 300 works of art to the district. Most were created by local artists and like the Sidaner painting, many are displayed in school offices and other buildings throughout the district.

Guest Louise Lippincott, head of the department of fine arts at the Carnegie Museum of Art, has followed the history of the Sidaner painting