Pennsylvania Resources Council

Wild & Scenic Film Festival

Two local groups dedicated to cleaning up Pittsburgh are hosting a film festival that explores environmental issues around the country.

First Pittsburgh Garbage Olympics Makes Trash Clean-Up A Competition

Oct 12, 2017
Keith Srakocic / AP

The first Pittsburgh Garbage Olympics will turn picking up litter into a sport. On Saturday morning five East End neighborhoods will go head to head in the competition to see which can pick up the most trash.

Peter Kaminski / flickr

It’s time to stop using blue Giant Eagle grocery bags to hold recyclables.

whatleydude / flickr

Recycling electronic devices remains unpopular despite the passage of legislation meant to streamline the process, according to new research.

Pennsylvania’s Covered Device Recycling Act was passed in 2010 and prevented residents from discarding certain electronics, such as televisions, with normal garbage.

Changing The Way Pennsylvania Recycles E-Waste

Mar 3, 2016
Ruocaled / flickr

Since its passage in 2010, the Covered Device Recycling Act has worked to keep electronics, including TVs and computers, out of landfills.  As the Act nears final implementation stages, however, it’s become increasingly difficult for Pennsylvanians to find organizations that will take their e-waste at an affordable cost. Justin Stockdale, Regional Director of the Pennsylvania Resource Council, says the CDRA is creating problems for his organization’s annual “Hard-to-Recycle” event. He’ll join us live along with Representative Chris Ross of Chester County, one of the original sponsors of CDRA, who is collaborating with other lawmakers to find a solution.

Dan McKay / Flickr

 

Among those New Year’s goals of eating healthier, volunteering more or sticking to a new hobby, the Pennsylvania Resources Council also wants resolution makers to add one more thing: recycling.

Composting and recycling bottles, cans, paper and any potentially hazardous material are easy ways to get involved, said Justin Stockdale, the council's regional director.

Many common chemicals cannot be disposed of in traditional ways, and for that reason, the Pennsylvania Resources Council is hosting a drive-thru chemical collection from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the South Park Wave Pool parking lot on Saturday.

Those crutches that you still have from when you broke your ankle 10 years ago. The bike your kids never ride anymore. Even your old VHS tapes.

These are a few of the donations you can make at the Pennsylvania Resources Council’s fourth annual “ReuseFest” this Saturday, June 13 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at UPMC Passavant in the North Hills.

ReuseFest will feature eight local nonprofit organizations that will be taking donations, including Animal Rescue League Shelter and Wildlife Center, Construction Junction, Off the Floor Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh Gives Back and Goodwill.

Courtesy Photo/ Pennsylvania Resources Center

More than 1,500 Allegheny County residents are expected to drive to North Park next Saturday, not bearing bicycles or picnic baskets, but instead — hazardous waste.

The Pennsylvania Resources Council is beginning its 13th year of household chemical collections with a drive-through waste drop off in North Park from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 2.

People are encouraged to bring any leftover paint, bleach, furniture polish, gasoline, glue, cleaners, car waxes, and even fingernail polish they have in their homes or garages to the park, where trained disposal crews will haul the chemicals away for treatment and disposal.

Along with pop bottles and cigarette butts, another big name is joining the roadside trash Pantheon, televisions.

In January 2013 the Covered Device Recycling Act became effective across Pennsylvania. The law made it illegal for municipal trash collectors to pick up devices such as TVs, computers, and even keyboards. The purpose of the law was to rid landfills of harmful materials usually found in these devices including cadmium, beryllium, and lead.