Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

The National Science Foundation has awarded $9.65 million to the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Monday to create a user-friendly supercomputer called “Bridges.”

Unlike other systems that require users to login, punch in commands using specialized computing skills and wait a few days for the results, Bridges allows scientists and researchers to access the database online through a series of portals, which Nick Nystrom, director of strategic applications at the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, said leads to a more fluid experience.

Pennsylvania Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley stopped by the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center in Oakland on Tuesday. Without getting into specifics, Cawley thanked employees for helping make Pittsburgh and Pennsylvania competitive in the technological arena.

"Technology and research play a significant, if not critical, role in creating opportunities and fostering that robust economy that we all want and need," he said.

Pittsburgh area researchers are getting a major boost in their ability to share datasets, thanks to the work of the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

The Center is a collaboration of the University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University and Westinghouse Energy Center, and provides Internet connectivity to many universities and research centers in Western Pennsylvania and West Virginia through the Three Rivers Optical Exchange Internet2 system.

A local computing, communications and data-handling company has landed a 4-year $7.6 million grant from the National Science Foundation to develop a system capable of storing and computing enormous amounts of data.

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, a University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University project, is using the funding to develop a Data Exacell (DXC) prototype.

DXC will update the center’s current “Big Data” handling system called Data Supercell, which is able to hold about 4.2 million gigabytes of information.

The World Health Organization reports that more than 600,000 people die of malaria every year around the world.

In order to help combat that, a local supercomputing center is partnering with the University of Notre Dame and James Cook University in Australia.