Cleveland Indians Dropping Chief Wahoo Logo From Uniforms

Jan 29, 2018
Tony Dejak / AP

The Cleveland Indians announced Monday they are dropping the Chief Wahoo logo from their uniforms next year, bowing to decades of complaints that the grinning, red-faced caricature used since 1947 is racist.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Following legal suits arguing that the Pennsylvania's Congressional district map unfairly serves Republicans, the state Supreme Court has ordered new lines be constructed and submitted by Feb. 15, only three months before the commonwealth's primary elections. The GOP plans to appeal to the U.S.

Evan Vucci / AP

In two months, voters will choose a new congressman for Pennsylvania’s 18th District in a special election to replace Tim Murphy, who resigned after admitting to an extramarital affair. 

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

Members of the Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh said they are “saddened and humiliated” by an editorial published on Martin Luther King Jr. Day in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

Two local foundations say the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s editorial board is on the "wrong side of history" because of a piece it published Monday.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

Parents, side by side, held signs calling for Superintendent Toni Shute to resign.

“Give Shute the boot,” they chanted outside of a packed Oct. 9 Brooke County School District board meeting in Wellsburg, W.Va.

Courtesy of Phillip Atiba Goff

Fear, fatigue, mood and experience all affect how people interact with others. That's especially true when those actions have life or death consequences.

PIOTRUS / Wikimedia Commons

The City of Pittsburgh’s Art Commission is moving forward with its process of reviewing a controversial statue of the composer Stephen Foster.

Google Maps

Racist business cards bearing an image of a noose and a swastika have been found in a Pittsburgh neighborhood that is a hub of the city's Jewish community.

The cards have the swastika on one side with the message, "It's not illegal to be white ... yet" on the back next to an image of a noose.

The FBI says neo-Nazi and white supremacist literature and stickers have been showing up for more than two weeks in Squirrel Hill.

Piotrus / Wikimedia Commons

An online petition to remove a controversial statue of one of Pittsburgh's native sons in Oakland has gathered more than 1,000 signatures.

Sarah Schneider / 90.5 WESA

About 300 people marched from Homewood to North Point Breeze Saturday afternoon led by black activists and followed by white allies. 

The peaceful march organized by a group of black women and femmes intentionally prioritized the needs and voices of black attendees. All intersections of the black community including physical ability and sexual orientation and identity were welcomed as well as white allies. Organizer Deaja Baker said it was a chance to uplift the black communities.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh was one of many cities across the country where anti-racism rallies were held Sunday. A candlelight vigil drew a few hundred people to Schenley Plaza in Oakland.

Virginia Alvino Young / 90.5 WESA


Last year, Hopewell Memorial Junior High School started noticing some negative race-based comments being made among students. Studies show safe environments are essential for learning, and being victim to identity-based harassment can be especially detrimental in school.

Summit Against Racism

Pittsburgh’s 19th annual Summit Against Racism takes place Saturday.

This year’s summit coordinator Mary Parker said with so many other events going on this weekend surrounding the inauguration of Donald Trump, she received some requests to move the date of her event.

She said the summit is always held the Saturday after Martin Luther King Jr. Day.


In activist Sueño Del Mar's mind, Pittsburgh is always moving forward.

“We don’t sit by silently,” she said.

But even in a city with a rich history of social movements and organizing, corralling the events scheduled the week Donald Trump takes office has been tough. It certainly was not a unified front.


Two York County School of Technology High School students face disciplinary action after they carried a Donald Trump campaign sign while “white power” was chanted as they walked through the school’s halls Wednesday. 

Renie Mezzanotti, the school's communications and outreach coordinator, said the incident happened while students were walking into the school at the beginning of the day and administrators were quick to squash the issue.

Traisaun Leake / Hazelwood Youth Media Justice

If a student misbehaves in a Pittsburgh Public School, the administrators are bound by a disciplinary code. But which reactions are punitive? Which are restorative? And what's more likely to help the student and his or her classroom culture?

I write novels for a living, and novels are about how characters deal with the intrinsic conflicts that make them who they are — and their efforts to overcome them. Sometimes characters are able to overcome their conflicts and sometimes, in tragedies, they succumb to them, which results in ruin. This is why it troubled me so much to witness recent events unfold like something out of a book.

What's Up Pittsburgh / Facebook

A group of mostly first-timers showed up for one of What’s Up Pittsburgh’s open meetings last Monday night.

Facilitator Lizzie Anderson asked participants sitting on the floor to squish together to make room for latecomers in the room, which was packed well beyond capacity.

On June 17, 2015, Malcolm Graham learned that his sister, Cynthia Graham Hurd, a librarian and a devout Christian, was one of nine victims shot and killed at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston. Here is Graham, a career politician who recently lost a Congressional bid in North Carolina, in his own words on what it was like to lose "the glue" that held his family together.

I was at home getting ready for bed in Charlotte and I saw the news scroll at the bottom of the TV. It said that there was a shooting in Charleston at Emanuel and people were feared dead.

Free Speech And The Firing Of Wendy Bell

Apr 1, 2016
Christopher P / flickr

The firing of award-winning journalist and 18-year WTAE-TV news anchor Wendy Bell made both local and national news. Wednesday, Pittsburgh's ABC-TV news affiliate  “ended its relationship” with the news anchor, deeming her comments “inconsistent with the company’s ethics and journalistic standards.”

Summit Against Racism

The first Saturday after Martin Luther King Jr. Day marks the 18th annual Summit Against Racism, a day-long conference that promotes dialogue on race and ethnicity, as well as gender and sexuality.

Event organizers are expecting more than 400 guests, the best attendance in the event’s history.

Courtesy American Friends Service Committee

Wesley Peters is a 17-year-old student at Pittsburgh Creative and Performance Arts School, and said he encounters racism on a regular basis.

“As a young, African-American male, I’ve experienced racism and other microaggressions throughout my daily life,” Peters said.

Peters will be one of around 100 youths to attend the Youth Undoing Institutional Racism (YUIR) Weekend this Friday through Sunday at Bethel AME Church in the Hill District. Sponsored by the American Friends Service Committee, the event will target issues such as the “School-to-Prison Pipeline” and the history of racial inequalities in the United States.