Sick Days

Courtesy Jennifer England / Pink Coat Communications

Workers in Pennsylvania’s largest city now have the right to earn and use sick days without retaliation, thanks to a bill passed by Philadelphia City Council in February.

But for the state’s second biggest city, it might not be so straightforward.

A bill in the state House Labor and Industry Committee would prohibit municipal governments from mandating that businesses offer sick leave to employees.

Campaigning while convalescing will be a criminal act if State Rep. Tony DeLuca’s latest bill passes muster.

 

DeLuca, D-Penn Hills, introduced House Bill 1177 last week.

 

Public employees would face a misdemeanor charge, fines up to $1,000 and up to a year in prison for canvassing neighborhoods, planning elections and political fundraising while using sick time granted by their employer. The bill would also prohibit circulating nomination petitions or papers and participating in organized telephone campaigns that could influence the outcome of an election.

Before he took the oath of office, Gov. Tom Wolf said that as governor he would push for legislation that would implement paid sick leave for employees of businesses with 50 of more employees. That has some business groups in the state concerned.

“We’ve gone through this issue before,” said Gene Barr, president of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry. “The problem isn’t in having people get sick time, it’s in government mandating or dictating exactly what that structure needs to look like.”

It’s not uncommon for individual municipalities to set a minimum wage that is higher than the state- and federally-mandated rate. As of Jan. 1, San Franciscans are making at least $10.55 an hour, compared to the California minimum wage of $8.

Now, state representative Seth Grove (R-York) wants to make that kind of municipal legislation illegal in Pennsylvania.