Special Education

A recently approved tweak to special education funding won’t apply to charter schools, after all. State lawmakers shied away from the changes after charters argued it would have been unfair.

There will be changes to the way traditional public schools receive any new funding for special education — it’ll be based on the needs of individual students and school districts, instead of being tied to an average special needs cost across the state.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

For the first time, Pennsylvania lawmakers are developing a specific funding formula for special education in the commonwealth.

Currently, funding is based on the assumption that within every school district 16 percent of the students are in need of special education.

State lawmakers are staring down a funding formula that some say is a recipe for a budgeting disaster.

It's the commonwealth's way of paying for federally-required special education services, and it's the subject of a special commission whose recommendations for legislative fixes are due this fall.

A new panel in charge of coming up with a different funding formula for special education in Pennsylvania is in place.

The commission of state lawmakers and a few members of the governor’s cabinet will attempt to find a replacement for the current formula, which doles out money based on a set percentage of each school district’s enrollment.

State Republican Representative Bernie O’Neill of Bucks County pushed for the panel for years.