Tourism

A sweltering Steel City summer may be one for the record books, according to VisitPittsburgh Executive Vice President Jason Fulvi. 

The group hosted its annual “Fall Forecast” at the Pittsburgh Marriott City Center on Thursday to inform locals of upcoming fall and winter events and to highlight the economic impact of tourists at large. About 130 people attended.

Attendees to every one of Pittsburgh's six summertime conventions are expected to generate about $1,000 each, says Jason Fulvi, executive vice president for VisitPittsburgh.

The group expects 40,000 to flood the Steel City for convention season, bringing in about $40 million total.

“We have more conventions and larger conventions than ever before," Fulvi says. "So (guests) will be able to really partake in the different activities, festivals and attractions that we have."

Pittsburgh should be a gracious host.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh’s visitors and tourism bureau, VisitPITTSBURGH said 2014 was a strong year, but that 2015 is shaping up to be busier.

The organization released its annual report Thursday, highlighting the economic impact tourism has on the region. Each year the industry brings about $5.6 billion to the region and supports some 40,000 jobs.

Each year VisitPITTSBURGH, the city’s official tourism and promotion agency, releases an Official Visitors Guide to Pittsburgh. This year there’s a change.

“What makes this a little bit different this year is that our visitors guide, we’re changing the orientation from a portrait type of orientation to a landscape, which makes it very different than all of our competitive cities,” said Craig Davis, president and CEO of VisitPITTSBURGH.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

At its annual meeting Thursday, VisitPITTSBURGH highlighted some of the successes in tourism in the last couple of years.

The national group Tourism Economics releases data on the industry; 2012 numbers were recently released for Allegheny County.

Pennsylvania's rural areas are facing hard economic times, and a state lawmaker believes that tourism could be the answer.

“Pennsylvania is one of the largest rural states in the union, and when you look statistically it is our rural Pennsylvania that has the highest unemployment rates and I think it needs to be addressed,” said state Sen. John Wozniak (D-Cambria).

Pennsylvania’s tourism businesses want to see a change in the way counties tax hotel room stays and how they use the revenue.

The president of the Pennsylvania Association of Travel and Tourism told state lawmakers at a recent hearing the tax has gone too far afield from its original purpose to generate money to promote tourism.

Rob Fulton said some counties have been too quick to use the funds for other tangential expenses.

A new partnership of organizations is aiming to teach Pennsylvanians about the impact hunting has on the state’s economy.

A diverse group that ranges from chambers of commerce leaders to small business owners has formed a partnership called Hunting Works for Pennsylvania.

This partnership was created to advocate for public policy that supports jobs and economic prosperity.