United Way

Comcast Corporation on Saturday announced a $25,000 grant for the Sarah Heinz House on the Northside, the home of one of Pittsburgh’s many Boys and Girls Club locations.

Comcast executive vice president David L. Cohen made the announcement at the start of the annual Comcast Cares Day.

“Comcast Cares Day is the largest single corporate volunteer day of service in America,” Cohen said. “Last year we had 95,000 volunteers and members of their families working on 800 projects in 35 states and 11 foreign countries.”

More than 60 percent of Allegheny County’s impoverished residents live in suburban neighborhoods, according to a 2013 report by the Brookings Institution, and veterans make up about 33 percent of Pittsburgh’s homeless population.

Those are just two of the reasons why the United Way of Allegheny County announced Wednesday that the nonprofit will expand several programs over the next three years to improve the quality of life for struggling families, women and veterans in the region.

Snow might be one of the most dreaded four-letter words in Western Pennsylvania, but city and country officials are trying to make it a little less frightful for elderly and disabled residents.

This winter, the volunteer-based snow removal program, Snow Angels, is expanding throughout Allegheny County.

The program pairs volunteers of any age with residents 60 or older, or those with disabilities, to assist with shoveling snow along driveways and sidewalks. Since Snow Angels’ in 2011, volunteers have shoveled more than 50,000-square-feet of city sidewalks.

Jessica Nath / 90.5 WESA

Ty’wann Martin, a 7th grader, gripped the microphone, popped up from his seat and sauntered up to the front of the room filled with CEOs and executives from the United Way and First Niagara Bank Thursday.

“Hi, my name is Ty’wann, and I go to Pittsburgh Schiller,” he declared. “And when I get older, I would like to be an NBA player.”

He and a group of students from Schiller and Pittsburgh Classical Academy Middle Schools are part of the United Way of Allegheny County mentoring program.

Salvation Army, Westmorland United Way Sever Ties

Jul 2, 2014

The New Kensington Salvation Army Corps has severed ties with the Westmoreland County United Way over a tax form dispute.

After more than a decade of giving grant money to the local Salvation Army, United Way has turned down an application for future funds due to the Army’s refusal to complete IRS Form 990.

The 990 is a 12-page form that certain federally tax-exempt organizations must fill out annually. It contains information about the organizations programs, mission, and finances.

United Way of Allegheny County announced that it raised $33,987,061 from its 2013 campaign-- 2.3 percent increase from the previous year’s total.

Marking its fourth consecutive year of growth, the charity surpassed its internal goal of  $33,883,317.

Bob Nelkin, United Way President, said he believes the charity continues growing because donors are able to see the impact of their donations.

The United Way announced a more “holistic” way to assist PA 2-1-1 Southwest callers Tuesday.

PA 2-1-1 is a free human service helpline that connects Pennsylvanians with basic needs such as utilities, housing, employment and food.  It also helps connect people to agencies that can answer questions about the Affordable Care Act or help with free tax preparation.

Bob Nelkin, United Way of Allegheny County president, said people who call 2-1-1 need help navigating what he called a “confusing maze.”

Hade2k / flickr

For anyone who has ever had to utilize social services: from help with unemployment, to getting utilities turned on or accessing SNAP benefits - being pointed in the right direction by a live person can be immensely helpful.

PA 2-1-1 Southwest is a resource and information hub that connects people with community, health and disaster services through a 24 hour hotline and website.

Julie DeSeyn is the Community Impact Director of the United Way and Director of 211 Southwest.

United Way Report: Elderly Needs on the Rise

Oct 23, 2013

Fewer funds and resources for elderly and disabled people along with a growing aging population are creating problems of “epic proportion,” according to a new report from the United Way of Allegheny County.

United Way President Bob Nelkin said that with new medical advancements people are now outliving their spouses and caregivers more than before, and their needs are increasing. 

A family member is struck with cancer, a single mother loses her job, a couple splits in a divorce, scenarios like these occur everyday and can create economic pitfalls for women already fighting to stay afloat in tough economic times.

Now the Allegheny Chapter of United Way is sponsoring several organizations in the region to give a helping hand to women caught in economic crises.

United Way of Allegheny County announced its funding allocations for children and youth programs this week, giving $2.4 million to more than 15 programs.

United Way focused its attention on after school programs, summer programs, future leaders programs, college preparation programs and science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs.

Alicia Chatkin, United Way’s director of programs for children and youth, said the funding is meant to help children in two age groups.