U.S. Justice Department

Keith Srakocic / AP

Americans who live in high-crime neighborhoods often get portrayed as anti-police, but an Urban Institute study released in February shows something different: strong respect for the law and a willingness to help with public safety.

Sue Ogrocki / AP

 

Chesapeake Energy, which is facing a royalty owners revolt here in Pennsylvania, will have to share more details of their accounting practices with the U.S. Department of Justice. The company revealed in a recent filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that the Justice Department has subpoenaed records on the gas driller’s accounting methods for “the acquisition and classification of oil and gas properties and related matters.”

Reed Saxon / AP

 

Local courts that jail poor defendants because they can't afford to pay bail are unlawfully discriminating against the poor, federal attorneys say in a legal brief in a Georgia lawsuit.

The U.S. Justice Department says such policies are unconstitutional.

The federal brief was filed Thursday with the 11th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in the lawsuit of a north Georgia man who spent six days in jail in the city of Calhoun because he couldn't afford $160 bail following his arrest on a misdemeanor charge.

Pennsylvania Dept. of Corrections

 

A new study designed to reduce crime and the size of Pennsylvania's prison population is about to get underway.

Gov. Tom Wolf and other government officials on Thursday announced Pennsylvania will be getting data crunching help and policy recommendations from the study by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Council of State Governments' Justice Center and the U.S. Justice Department.

Topics will include how bail is set, the value of pretrial diversion and alternatives to incarceration.