International Peace Day

  The United Nations established the International Day of Peace in 1981 to raise awareness about how violent behavior affects nations, schools and families alike, encouraging cease fires in war-torn nations and local reflection on how individual action affects others.

For the 15th year, Pittsburgh is participating with a rally, non-denominational prayer service and a festival. Sister Barbara Finch, the co-founder and co-organizer of the local observance of the International Day of Peace, said locals can take this as an opportunity to assess.

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

Black community leaders pleaded with Pittsburgh residents on Tuesday to end the gun violence that resulted in a string of deaths and injuries to local children this month.

Niya Ingram, a tenth grader at Brashear High School, listed “killing, bullying and…gangs” among the issues she and her peers are facing.

That’s why she is helping facilitate the Coalition Against Violence’s (CAV) “Strategies for Change” Youth Summit Friday in coordination with the Black Political Empowerment Project (B-PEP).

Liz Reid / 90.5 WESA

According to a 2014 report from the Children’s Defense Fund, American children and teens are four times more likely to be killed by gun violence than Canadian kids, 13 times more likely than French kids, and more than 64 times more likely to be killed by guns as children in the UK and Germany.

Many women will celebrate Valentine’s Day by spending some quality time with their significant others, but there are many other women who will spend the day in fear of intimate partner violence.

That’s why New Voices Pittsburgh, a community based organization dedicated to the health and well-being of black women and girls, is organizing a rally to end gender-based violence, to be held at noon Friday at Market Square.

Preventing Homicides Through Early Intervention

Oct 24, 2013
Matt Niemi / Flickr

Each year, the city of Pittsburgh sees more than 100 homicides.

A new study by the University of Pittsburgh suggests that 30% of last year’s homicides could have been prevented by early intervention.

Richard Garland, M.S.W., visiting instructor in the Department of Behavioral and Community Health Sciences and Steven Albert, Ph.D., chairman of the department, co-authored the study and say most of the criminal activity was a result of peer violence, not gang-related violence.

Ryan Loew / 90.5 WESA

Rachel Zwipf is packing. Boxes scattered around her home are being filled with pots, children’s toys and framed photos.

She’s moving to North Carolina, leaving behind a good job, her family and painful memories of Pittsburgh.  

"His name was Sean Thompson, but we all called him Lydell," she said.

Two summers ago, Zwipf’s fiancé was murdered in Lawrenceville, just a few blocks from their home. They were already planning to move. Thompson had spent years in jail for a slew of offenses and wanted a new start.