WWII

World War II-Era Planes To Touch Down In Johnstown

Jun 11, 2018
Ross D. Franklin / AP

The deep, ominous rumble of a Boeing B-29 Superfortress heavy bomber's four engines, a sound that echoed throughout the Pacific Ocean during World War II, was heard again on Monday in the skies above Richland Township.

"Fifi," one of only two B-29 Superfortresses in the world that still fly, touched down on Monday afternoon at John Murtha Johnstown-Cambria County Airport, as did two other World War II-era aircraft belonging to the Commemorative Air Force, a Texas-based nonprofit dedicated to preserving and showing historical aircraft at airshows.

Sarah Kovash / 90.5 WESA

The New York Times reported Monday that Naomi Parker Fraley, believed to be the inspiration for Rosie the Riveter, died at age 96.

But experts say she likely wasn’t the “Rosie” most of America knows and loves.

Uncovering Details About 'The Day Hitler Died'

Nov 16, 2015
The Day Hitler Died / Smithsonian Channel

Following the reported death of Adolf Hitler at the end of World War II, speculations arose about his potential escape, with some claiming that the dictator was still alive somewhere.  Judge Michael Musmanno, a Pittsburgh native, naval officer, and controversial judge in the Nuremburg Trials, made it his mission to prove that Hitler was, indeed, dead and gone.  

Rebecca Devereaux / 90.5 WESA

World War II ended 70 years ago this month, and we're commemorating the event by producing a show from the Heinz History Center’s exhibit: We Can Do It! WWII. The 10,000 square foot exhibit features 300 artifacts and focuses on Pittsburgh’s role on both the battlefield and the home front. We'll take a tour of the exhibit and talks with veterans from the area who served in both the European and Pacific theaters.  

Mike Richards / 90.5 WESA

John Tippins takes his nieces and daughter for an occasional ride on his farm in Ligonier -- on his tank.

That 1944 M4A3 Sherman is now parked in front of the Heinz History Center in the Strip Distrtict after a 60-mile journey Wednesday on a lowboy truck, which typically transports bulldozers, not military-grade vehicles. 

Tippins loaned it to the history center until Jan. 4 when the museum's World War II exhibition "We Can Do It" ends.

Via The Associated Press

[asset-audio[{"description": "Alarmed by the potential for American involvement in the Second World War, a group of Pittsburghers offered a unique proposition to halt German aggression. ", "fid": "8145", "uri": "npraudio://201504/web_reward_for_hitler_05012015.mp3"}]

The letter appeared in The New York Times on April 29, 1940. It was brief — a couple of column inches — mixed in with opinions on higher subway fares, workers’ rights and risky mortgages. But the headline was hard to miss: “Reward for Hitler Capture.”

"He offered a million dollars to anyone 'who will deliver Adolph Hitler, alive, unwounded and unhurt, into the custody of the League of Nations for trial before a high court of justice for his crimes against peace and dignity of the world.'”

The letter appeared in The New York Times on April 29, 1940. It was brief — a couple of column inches — mixed in with opinions on higher subway fares, workers’ rights and risky mortgages. But the headline was hard to miss: “Reward for Hitler Capture.”

"He offered a million dollars to anyone 'who will deliver Adolph Hitler, alive, unwounded and unhurt, into the custody of the League of Nations for trial before a high court of justice for his crimes against peace and dignity of the world.'”