90.5 WESA's Essential Pittsburgh

Essential Pittsburgh airs weekdays from noon to 1 p.m. and is repeated at 8 p.m.
Paul Guggenheimer

Essential Pittsburgh is a locally produced program from 90.5 WESA dedicated to developing a deep, ongoing exploration of critical issues affecting Pittsburgh and Western Pennsylvania, as well as featuring community leaders and newsmakers in the arts, sciences, technology, business, healthcare, government and education.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:50 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

Overcoming Physical And Mental Obstacles At Tough Mudder

Contestants hurdle one of the many obstacles at last year's Tough Mudder Pittsburgh
Credit Tough Mudder

The Tough Mudder is a 10-12 mile race, filled with obstacles, and designed by members of the British Special Forces. It was created to test the body and mind.

Contestants swim in frigid water, climb across monkey bars covered in grease, and run through live wires. The race has been immensely popular in the United States and around the world.

In the next week the Tough Mudder race comes to Pittsburgh. We talked about how to prepare with Fittsburgh co-founder Joe Vennare and Pittsburgh Tough Mudder course manager John Barker.

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:50 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

A Pittsburgh Journalist In The Middle East

Credit Betsy Hiel / Twitter

The Middle East has been at the center of global attention for at least the past decade, and the state of affairs have become increasingly chaotic following the uprisings that took place in several countries during 2011.

2014 is shaping up to be another monumental year, with rebels threatening to overthrow the Iraqi government, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict reaching deadly heights, and a crucial presidential election in Turkey, just to name a few.

As important to world news as these events are, most local papers do not feel these happenings are relevant to their coverage.

An exception to that would be the Tribune-Review, which has Betsy Hiel, a Pittsburgher based in Cairo. Hiel has covered everything from protests, to the Olympics, and sometimes had to get in harms way to find her story. She joined us from Istanbul to talk about her experience in the middle east and break down what is really going on over there.

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:41 pm
Fri August 1, 2014

An Update on the August Wilson Center: The URA Strikes Back

Credit Heather McClain / 90.5 WESA

The battle for the future of the August Wilson Center has been a long and contentious one, but its a struggle that appears to be a ways off from its conclusion.

The building, named after the famous Pittsburgh playwright and dedicated to the celebration of African American culture, has been in trouble ever since it was completed in 2009. The building is valued at $40 million, and was put up for sale earlier this year.

New York developer 980 Liberty Partners has proposed converting the building, at least partially, into a hotel, and has the resources to purchase the center.

They face fierce opposition from the Urban Redevelopment Authority, who is trying to block the sale of the building by any means. Tribune-Review reporter Natasha Lindstrom stopped by to update us on the continuing saga.

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Essential Pittsburgh
7:33 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Friday Rundown: An Update on Bidding for the August Wilson Center

Can the URA block specific developers from purchasing the August Wilson Center?
Credit Heather McClain / 90.5 WESA

These topics air Friday August 1, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

A Pittsburgher's Perspective on the Middle East

With so many critical developments taking place in the Middle East, we'll check in with Pittsburgh Tribune-Review reporter Betsy Hiel who is stationed in that volatile region. She was in Iraq a month ago and will give us an update on the situation there. She will also talk about Gaza and what's happening with Israel, as well as the upcoming presidential election in Turkey where she currently resides.

August Wilson Center Update

Recent court filings argue Pittsburgh's Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) is abusing its role as a governmental agency. The URA opposes the sale of the August Wilson Center to developer 980 Liberty Partners. However black leaders support the developer's offer to purchase the debt-plagued cultural center. Tribune Review reporter Natasha Lindstrom joins us with an update on the continuing saga of the August Wilson Center.

Tough Mudder

Designed and created by British Special Forces, a tough mudder is an obstacle course which tests participants strength and endurance. It’s also a test of mental and physical stamina. The Pittsburgh/Ohio Valley Tough Mudder takes place in a week. Find out what you should know before entering one, and how to train for this type of event from Joe Vennare, co-founder of the fitness site Fittsburgh.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:53 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Faked, Forgotten, Found: An Altered Renaissance Painting Revealed Through Forensics

Portrait of Isabella de’ Medici showing the 19th-century overpainting, before restoration
Carnegie Museum of Art

The Carnegie Museum of Art's current exhibition of Renaissance paintings that underwent serious forensic investigation is called Faked, Forgotten, Found.

Lulu Lippincott, the institution's Curator of Fine Arts looks at the science of art preservation and restoration, as well as the winding paths that these works have followed to Pittsburgh.

Lippincott says the museum was skeptical when they “rediscovered” a painting of Isabella de Medici while Lippincott was cleaning up the museum’s collection of art. So skeptical, in fact, they took it to be X-rayed.

What they found was outstanding. She says the X-ray revealed that the painting had been “painted over” in the Victorian era. People in that era had the wrong idea of Isabella de Medici for years.

As seen in the X-rays, Lippincott says it’s almost as though the painting was airbrushed to make de Medici look better.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:17 pm
Thu July 31, 2014

Thousands of Disabled Workers Legally Paid Sub-Minimum Wage

Autumn Self, a 26-year-old blind woman, sorts papers at the Westmoreland County Blind Association in Greensburg. She's worked for below minimum wage there for six years. "I think this is the only job I could have," she said.
Credit Martha Rial / PublicSource

About 13,000 disabled Pennsylvania workers are being paid far below minimum wage, earning an average of $2.40 an hour in legal sub-minimum wages, according to a recent PublicSource article by Halle Stockton.

Does this practice provide opportunities for people who wouldn't otherwise have a job? Or does it exploit those who could work for minimum wage?

Stockton says these workers are legally paid sub-minimum wages and are supervised by mostly non-disabled workers. Stockton says the working conditions can range from work programs on beautiful campuses, to those of industrial settings.

No matter the conditions, however, Stockton says the pay is based on “pieces.”

“This is all piecework. You get paid for every box of paper you shred; you get paid twenty cents. Or every jewelry box, eleven cents. So, these supervisors are watching and recording that. This person completed three this hour, or completed four, and that’s what translates into your paycheck.”

Curtis Decker is the Executive Director of the National Disability Rights Network. He says people don’t apply for jobs they don’t have the skill set for. Decker does not approve of these sub-minimum wage programs but still believes people need the training so they can realize their greater potential.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:16 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Thursday Rundown: Suitable Pay for Disabled Workers

Michael Kissel, 36, transports paper to be shredded at the Westmoreland County Blind Association in Greensburg. Kissel, who has Down syndrome, said he earned $57 on his last biweekly paycheck.
Credit Martha Rial / PublicSource

These topics air Thursday July 31, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

Opportunity or Exploitation? 

About 13,000 disabled Pennsylvania workers are being paid far below minimum wage, earning an average of $2.40 an hour in legal sub-minimum wages. Does this practice provide opportunities for people who wouldn't otherwise have a job? Or does it exploit those who could work for minimum wage? Public Source reporter Halle Stockton joins us to examine these questions. Also joining the conversation are Charlotte Swenson, the mother of a woman with Down syndrome who is paid sub-minimum wage, and Curtis Decker, Executive Director of the National Disability Rights Network. 

Faked, Forgotten, Found

The Carnegie Museum of Art's current exhibition of Renaissance paintings that underwent serious forensic investigation is called "Faked, Forgotten, Forged." Lulu Lippincott, the institution's curator of fine arts joins us to look at the science of art preservation and restoration, as well as the winding paths that these works have followed to Pittsburgh. 

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:00 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Improving Pittsburgh's Air Quality

Credit Dane Summerville / Flickr

Pittsburgh does not have the best air quality in the nation- far from it- but ask anyone who grew up in the city before the 1950’s and they’ll tell you that it used to be much worse.

Smog blanketed the city, leading to days in which the streetlights were kept on around the clock. The era of Pittsburgh being known as “hell with the lid off” ended when Mayor David Lawrence began enforcing the Smoke Control Ordinance in the late 1940s.

Doctors and scientists are being called upon to speak at the hearings being held this week in Pittsburgh over the EPA’s new Clean Power Plan.

To asses the new plan from the health angle were Dr. Alan Lockwood of Physicians for Social Responsibility and Kevin Stewart, director of Environmental Health American Lung Association of the Mid-Atlantic.

Dr. Lockwood believed that the new regulations would be a huge step toward improving air quality.

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:47 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

Economic Benefits Of Renewable Energy?

Credit Roland Peschetz / Flickr

The EPA’s Clean Power Plan is the cornerstone of President Obama’s climate action plan. Four hearings are being held in four different cities: Atlanta, Washington D.C., Denver, and Pittsburgh.

During these hearing, environmental, business, and health experts will share their opinions on whether the gains that the plan gives the country are greater than the sacrifices that will need to be made.

To examine this issue from an economic standpoint we had Communitopia president Joylette Portlock and Blue/Green Alliance executive director Kim Glass stop by our South Side studio.

Portluck said that even without the new regulations, the coal industry has been shrinking its workforce.

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:24 pm
Wed July 30, 2014

What Role Will Coal Play in Pennsylvania's Future?

Credit Joseph A / flickr

Coal has long played an important role in the history of western Pennsylvania. It was coal that was excavated in the areas surrounding Pittsburgh, and then shipped to the city where it was used to power the steel mills.

It made for an effective system of production, but the smog that blanketed the city could turn days into nights.

Following World War II, civic leaders sought to clean up Pittsburgh, and reducing smog was particularly important. That struggle continues today- coal is still a major player in local energy, but the government is still looking to further curtail its pollution.

The EPA announced it’s Clean Power Plan in June, and hearings are being held this week in several U.S. cities. One of those cities is Pittsburgh- the biggest city in Appalachia, the heart of coal country. Environmentalists strongly support the reforms, but plenty of citizens in the region worry about a loss of jobs and an increase in energy prices.

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Essential Pittsburgh
7:13 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Wednesday Rundown: EPA Plans for Clean Power and Cutting Emissions

Looking at future energy plans and the upcoming EPA hearings on reducing carbon emissions.
Credit Roland Peschetz / Flickr

These topics air Wednesday July 30, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

Clean Power Plan

This week Pittsburgh is one of four U.S. cities holding public hearings on the EPA’s Clean Power Plan. The goal of the plan is to limit carbon emissions from existing power plants. It’s also considered the cornerstone of President Obama’s climate action plan. The hearings will provide interested parties the opportunity to present data, and views or arguments concerning the proposed action. Taking part in the conversation is George Ellis, president of the PA Coal Alliance on the importance of coal to the region.

Clean Power Plan Overview

Public hearings are being held in Pittsburgh on Thursday and Friday of this week. The plan will set benchmarks for limiting carbon pollution from existing power plants. This is the cornerstone of President Obama's climate action plan. Joining us to discuss the plan in Christina Simeone, director of the Penn Future Energy Center.

Clean Power & Green Labor

Among the people giving testimony at the EPA public hearings are representatives of business, labor and health. Joining us to address the jobs and clean energy aspect of the proposed rule are Joylette Portlock, president of Communitopia and Kim Glass, executive director of the Blue/Green Alliance.

Clean Power & Health

It is expected that the clean power plan will go a long way towards aiding public health. Reduction of asthma attacks and the ability to make strides in fighting respiratory and heart disease are seen as potential benefits. Here to address the health aspect of the clean power plan are Dr. Alan Lockwood of Physicians for Social Responsibility and Kevin Stewart, director of Environmental Health American Lung Association of the Mid-Atlantic.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:56 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

Pennsylvania Cautiously Boosts Speed Limit

A 1940 speed limit sign for the Pennsylvania turnpike, which is now as low as 55 mph in some areas.
Credit Ann Rosener / Library of Congress/Wikipedia

The Pennsylvania Turnpike, like a young driver, has a history of suddenly speeding up and slowing down.

In the 1940’s, the speed limit was 70, which was dropped to 65 during World War II. It shot back up to 70 in the 1950’s but the gas shortage of the late 1970’s led the speed limit to be cut all the way down to 55 mph.

Now, the speed limit is 65 and will soon be boosted to 70 on interstate roads, following a trial period on carefully chosen roads, including a section of the turnpike between Blue Mountain exit 201, and Morgantown exit 298.

With a speed limit of 70 mph already in Ohio and West Virginia, is it about time for PA to match up with neighboring states? Renee Vid Colborn, Manager of Media and Public Relations at the PA Turnpike Commission and State Senator Jay Costa addressed the pros and cons of an increased speed limit for area highways.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:45 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

How World War I Divided One of Pittsburgh's Historic Churches

The Smithfield United Church today
Credit Heather McClain / 90.5 WESA

Pittsburgh has always had a large German population, and for centuries the German Evangelical Protestant Church, now known as the Smithfield United Church of Christ, was the pride of the community.

The church featured opulent stained-glass windows and a steeple which at one point, could be seen from any part of the city. Pittsburgh’s oldest organized church is now hidden between towering skyscrapers, a reminder of the city’s past. Historian Donn Neal joined us to look back at an especially trying time in the church’s history: World War I, which began in earnest 100 years ago this week.

The church was important, Neal says, because it was the center of German community.

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Essential Pittsburgh
6:34 pm
Tue July 29, 2014

The Millennials Are Coming: Paying Attention to Their Consumer Habits and Traits

By the year 2025 Millennials will make up approximately 75% of the U.S. workforce.
Credit thetaxhaven / Flickr

In the next decade the economy will experience one of the largest demographic workplace changes in modern history. By the year 2025 Millennials will make up approximately 75% of the U.S. workforce, and worldwide this generation will account for 50% of those employed.

This week contributor, Rebecca Harris, Director of the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University, looks at the The Business of Millennials.

There are 80 million Millennials, or those of “Generation Y” in the United States today, making up an entire quarter of the population.  Pittsburgh makes yet another list, coming in 15th in the Niche, Best Cities for Millennials list.  The best places for them to live in the city include Shadyside and Friendship

In addition to aligning themselves with brands and products with a good mission, Harris outlines just who the Millennials are.

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Essential Pittsburgh
11:20 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Tuesday Rundown: Pennsylvania Roads Take Slow Steps to Prep for Faster Driving

A speed limit 70 miles sign along the Pennsylvania Turnpike in 1942. The limit has since decreased to 65 mph, and 55 mph in some areas, but that can soon change.
Credit Ann Rosener / Library of Congress/Wikipedia

These topics air Tuesday July 29, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

Speed Limit Increase

The Pennsylvania Turnpike recently debuted a 70 mph speed limit from Blue Mountain exit 201, to Morgantown exit 298. While the area stretches from the center of the state to the east, after a trial period, the speed limit increase will soon be coming to Western PA's interstate roads. With a speed limit of 70 mph already in Ohio and West Virginia, is it about time for PA to match up with neighboring states? Renee Vid Colborn, Manager of Media and Public Relations at the PA Turnpike Commission and State Senator Jay Costa address the pros and cons of an increased speed limit for area highways.

A Church Divided

This week marks the 100th anniversary of Austria-Hungary declaring war on Serbia, setting off a chain reaction that resulted in the outbreak of World War I. While America remained neutral, Germany came to Austria's defense, which put Germans in Pittsburgh in a difficult position, and directly affected a downtown church on Smithfield Street. Historian Donn Neal joins us to talk about how life forever changed for the German Evangelical Protestant Church now known as the Smithfield United Church of Christ, Downtown.

WESA Celebrates- Dr. Bill Neches' Heart Camp for Kids

For one special week, Camp Kon-o-Kwee is taken over by a group of very excited campers. All these campers have at least one thing in common: They’re growing up with congenital heart disease. Founded 24 years ago by Dr. Bill Neches, Heart Camp for Kids is a summer camp specifically for children and teenagers living with heart disease. Dr. Neches and the Heart Camp for Kids are profiled this week as part of 90.5 WESA Celebrates People Making a Difference. 

The Business of Millennials

In the next decade the economy will experience one of the largest demographic workplace changes in modern history. By the year 2025 Millennials will make up approximately 75% of the U.S. workforce, and worldwide this generation will account for 50% of those employed. This week contributor, Rebecca Harris, Director of the Center for Women’s Entrepreneurship at Chatham University, looks at the The Business of Millennials.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:24 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Poor Health: As the Region's Healthcare Industry Grows, Charitable Care is Hard to Find

With eleven Pittsburgh hospitals closing in the first decade of the 21st century, it's becoming even more difficult for people to get all healthcare aspects in one place.
Credit Connor Tarter / Flickr

One quarter of Pittsburgh area hospitals closed in the first decade of the 21st Century, drastically reducing the amount of charitable care available to the poor. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter Sean Hamill looks at the implications in his two-part series "Poor Health."

Hamill spent a good deal of time speaking to people in clinic waiting rooms, he says while these people know where they can possibly see a doctor, they are only seen for five minutes. Hamill says hospitals were not like this years ago.

“The big advantage to the hospitals that existed before they were torn down…was, once you came in for something more severe than a cold, it might require some specialty care, some diagnostics care, you could get that all within the same hospital. They would keep you there, they would do the triage you required through an emergency room, but they would also make sure you got that next level of care.”

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:13 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

College Students Still Struggling with Math and Writing

Studies show freshmen are still struggling with math and writing skills upon entering college.
Credit Scott Akerman / Flickr

A great deal of concern is given to young children being ready to learn once they begin attending elementary school. But what happens when those children grow up and are ready to attend college?

A study by the U.S. Department of Education finds one in four college freshmen lack reading and math skills for entry level-college work. This results in students needing to take at least one noncredit remedial class.

California University of Pennsylvania is working to reduce the amount of remedial help needed by students. Daniel Engstrom, associate provost in the Office of Academic Success at California University of Pennsylvania explains why more and more students are coming into college unprepared.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:06 pm
Mon July 28, 2014

Bad Behavior in Sports: What Can Be Done?

Ray Rice is facing a two game suspension for violating the NFL's personal conduct policy.
Credit Keith Allison / Flickr

Bad behavior in sports might seem to be running rampant these days. With the two-game suspension given to Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice for domestic violence, many believe the sentence should have been stiffer.

Also, considering some of the bad behavior carried out by Russia, are they fit to host the 2018 World Cup? John Affleck, Knight Chair in Sports Journalism at Penn State discussed recent bad behavior in sports.

In regards to backlash over only a two game suspension for Ray Rice’s domestic violence case, Affleck says it’s all about how the NFL approaches punishment.

“Roger Goodell has sort of divided things into sort of two frames of references. One is punishments for things that hurt the game, hurt competitiveness. The NFL is fairly consistent when it comes to things like that. It’s things like drug use,” Affleck explains.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:01 pm
Sun July 27, 2014

Monday Rundown: Addressing Healthcare Needs of the Poor

One of the new emergency patient rooms at UPMC East, in Monroeville.
Credit Daveynin / Flickr

These topics air Monday July 28, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

Poor Health

One quarter of Pittsburgh area hospitals closed in the first decade of the 21st Century, drastically reducing the amount of charitable care available to the poor. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter Sean Hamill joins us to discuss his two-part series examining this problem called "Poor Health." 

Colleges Take on Student's Remedial Needs

A great deal of concern is given to young children being ready to learn once they begin attending elementary school. But what happens when those children grow up and are ready to attend college? A study by the U.S. Department of Education finds one in four college freshmen lack reading and math skills for entry level-college work. This results in students needing to take at least one noncredit remedial class. We’ll discover how California University of Pennsylvania is working to reduce the amount of remedial help needed by students with Daniel Engstrom, associate provost in the Office of Academic Success at California University of Pennsylvania.

More Bad Behavior in Sports

John Affleck, Knight Chair in Sports Journalism at Penn State joins us to discuss recent bad behavior in sports, including the two-game suspension given to Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice for domestic violence. Many believe the sentence should have been stiffer. Also, considering some of the bad behavior carried out by Russia, are they fit to host the 2018 World Cup?

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:37 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Increasing Noise and Less Silence Could Be Causing Unconscious Stress

The Wonder Boys of "I Wonder PGH," Ellis Robinson and Daniel Tkacik.
Credit Marcus Charleston / WESA

From annoying ringtones to everyday noise pollution, it seems like our world is getting noisier. The Wonder Boys, Ellis Robinson and Daniel Tkacik of “I Wonder PGH,” went in search of an answer. Their findings are revealed in a thrilling installment of the Mysteries of Pittsburgh. They wondered, was it this hard to find silent spaces 50 or even 100 years ago?

Robinson and Tkacik spoke with author George Prochnik, who answered this question with the research he has done for his latest book, The Pursuit of Silence.

“It can be difficult to make the argument that things are noisier in the sense that everywhere there are higher volumes today than there were in the past. At the same time, there’s not necessarily more noise everywhere, there’s less silence.”

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:22 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

Can Denying Hearing Loss Affect Your Job?

Using earplugs in loud situations reduces damage done to your hearing, which can build up over time.
Credit chrissylong / Flickr

A new research survey by EPIC Hearing Healthcare finds that 30 percent of U.S. employees suspect they have hearing loss, but have not sought treatment.

Of those, almost 95 percent say it impacts them on the job yet many go out of their way to hide their hearing loss for fear of losing their job.

Pittsburgh audiologist, Dr. Suzanne Yoder says preconceived notions about hearing loss is what hinders most people from getting the help they need.

“Hearing loss unfortunately has that bad reputation where people feel like if they admit they have a hearing problem, they’re going to be seen as being old, which is something that they don’t want. Or, they’ll be seen as less capable, that their employer will think less of them, or treat them differently, maybe not give them that promotion. The sad thing is, it’s actually the reverse. You treat your hearing loss and you deal with the issues, you’re more likely to earn a better living. There’s research to back that up, that shows there’s a loss of salary for those with untreated hearing loss. It’s extremely important to go out and start dealing with it and not bluffing your way through conversations. The reality is, when you bluff, when you pretend, you end up looking worse.”

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Essential Pittsburgh
4:08 pm
Fri July 25, 2014

AFL Quarterback Tommy Grady: A Real "Power" Player

Pittsburgh Power quarterback Tommy Grady is leading the team to its best season in recent years.
Credit Jeffrey Gamza / Pittsburgh Power

The Pittsburgh Power, the city’s professional arena football team, are having their best season, ever. They’re undefeated at home at Consol Energy Center and just clinched their first-ever playoff berth. While they don’t get as much recognition as the Steelers, what is life like for the men who play in the arena league?

Tommy Grady is the quarterback for the Pittsburgh Power and says the differences between the two leagues are vast.

“The game of arena football is a lot quicker, the field’s about half the size. We play on that hard turf, which is pretty hard on our bodies. The biggest thing is the speed and quickness of the game. A lot of guys have played in the NFL before, and it’s hard to adjust to the game.”

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Essential Pittsburgh
10:51 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Friday Rundown: Has the World Gotten Louder?

Are we exposed to higher decibels than previous generations?
Credit Nick Allen / Flickr

These topics air Friday July 25, 2014 at noon and 8pm on 90.5 WESA. Join the conversation LIVE between 12pm & 1 pm weekdays at 412-246-2002.

Is the World Getting Noisier?

From annoying ring tones to everyday noise pollution, doesn’t it seem like our world is noisier? Our Wonder Boys, Ellis Robinson and Daniel Tkacik, went in search of an answer. Their findings are revealed in this thrilling installment of the Mysteries of Pittsburgh.

Hearing Loss/Job Discrimination

A new research survey by EPIC Hearing Healthcare finds that 30 percent of U.S. employees suspect they have hearing loss, but have not sought treatment. Of those, almost 95 percent say it impacts them on the job yet many go out of their way to hide their hearing loss for fear of losing their job. Pittsburgh audiologist, Dr. Suzanne Yoder is our guest.

Power Player

The Pittsburgh Power, the city’s professional arena football team, are having their best season, ever. They’re undefeated at home and just clinched their first-ever playoff berth. While they don’t get as much recognition as the Steelers, what is life like for the men who play in the arena league? We’ll pose that question to Tommy Grady, quarterback for the Pittsburgh Power, join us in Studio A. 

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:56 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

The Governor's Jobs 1st Summit Coming to Pittsburgh

The "titans of industry" will be speaking at a jobs summit taking place next month, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry Secretary. Julia Hearthway said the "Governor's Jobs 1st Summit" will be speaking to employers about making sure their workforce is ready to embrace a changing industry landscape. She said it will also feature a discussion between Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett and business magnate T. Boone Pickens.

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Essential Pittsburgh
5:33 pm
Thu July 24, 2014

Summer in the City of Brotherly Love

Credit Gary McCabe / Flickr

Philadelphia is the largest and most populous city in the commonwealth. There’s a wealth of things to do as well as great things to eat. Travel contributor Elaine Labalme, who tweets about food and travel under the twitter handle New Girl in Town, takes us across the state to talk about enjoying summer in the city of brotherly love.

Philadelphia has many charms and certainly where the arts are concerned. Check out Elaine's list of places to stay, eat, drink and explore:

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