All Things Considered

Weekdays from 4pm to 6:30pm
Robert Siegel, Melissa Block and Audie Cornish

NPR's afternoon news magazine, featuring a mix of interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features from around the world, and in and around Pittsburgh, hosted locally by Larkin Page Jacobs.

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Around the Nation
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Despite Objections, Maine Governor Acts On Food Stamp Fraud

Gov. Paul LePage is using his executive power to push through new photo ID requirements on on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

To combat welfare and food stamp fraud, states across the nation are considering various steps, including requiring photos on Electronic Benefit Transfer cards. Massachusetts and New York are the only states with photo ID programs right now, but they'll soon be joined by Maine, whose Republican governor is using his executive authority to avoid a political battle and start a similar program.

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Europe
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

Eastern Ukraine Muddles Through Voting On Referendums

Separatists in the eastern Ukraine regions of Donetsk and Luhansk asked voters to take part in an unauthorized referendum Sunday on whether to make their region independent.

Television
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

'Stand Up Planet' Follows Jokes To Serious Global Issues

As part of the documentary Stand Up Planet, South African comedian Mpho Popps (left) and Indian comedian Aditi Mittal (right) came to Los Angeles to perform with Hasan Minhaj at the Laugh Factory.
Courtesy of StandUpPlanet.org

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:45 am

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Author Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

For Artistic Criminal, Breaking Rules Is Key To 'Creativity'

Philippe Petit, a French high-wire artist, walks across a tightrope suspended between the World Trade Center towers in New York on Aug. 7, 1974.
Alan Welner AP

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 10:19 am

Philippe Petit says he hates books on creativity.

So his new book, Creativity: The Perfect Crime, isn't a compilation of ideas from great philosophers or creators.

The wirewalker, magician, street performer and artist breaks that mold with a book full of sketches and personal dialogue that captures his personal creative process.

And because it's so personal, he says, it will be more useful. "I'm not doing any rules. This is not a thesis on creativity. This is a kind of an outlaw confession," he tells NPR's Arun Rath.

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Music
5:05 pm
Sun May 11, 2014

In The Studio With Rodrigo Y Gabriela

Rodrigo Y Gabriela's latest album is 9 Dead Alive.
Tina Korhonen Courtesy of the artist

A pair of former heavy metal guitarists who left Mexico for Ireland, Rodrigo y Gabriela developed an acoustic sound that has taken the duo from playing on the streets for change to some of the biggest stages on the festival circuit. Rodrigo Sanchez and Gabriela Quintero joined NPR's Arun Rath in the studio at NPR West to perform a few selections from their latest album, 9 Dead Alive. Hear the music, and their conversation, at the audio link.

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Sports
6:40 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Athletes Chased By Technology In The Sport Of Anti-Doping

Lance Armstrong (left) and Tyler Hamilton compete in the 90th Tour de France in 2003. Hamilton later testified in the doping case brought against Armstrong and the U.S. Postal cycling team.
Franck Fife AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 7:59 pm

As the Giro d'Italia bicycle race sets off in Ireland this weekend, the shadow of doping will not be far behind. In a competition to beat the cheaters, scientists are constantly trying to improve drug testing.

While it can be hard for regulators to keep up with new habits, when an athlete is finally caught doping, the result can be revolutionary.

Performance-enhancing drugs have plagued the sport of cycling for years, with Lance Armstrong at the center of the scandal. But he was not alone.

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Music Interviews
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Atmosphere's Seventh Album: Representing 'Southsiders'

Originally published on Sun May 11, 2014 9:03 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

When the hip-hop dual Atmosphere got their start back in the mid-'90s, mainstream rap was dominated by a harder, aggressive sound, think Dr. Dre or Notorious B-I-G. By contrast, with their spare production and tight, introspective lyrics, Atmosphere was something different.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

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Asia
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Conflicts Over Resources With China's Neighbors Have Deeper Motives

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 6:33 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Middle East
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

The View From Homs: Watching The Withdrawal Of Syria's Rebels

On Friday, the Syrian government evacuated the last of the rebel fighters from Homs, following a cease-fire agreement. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with Nabih Bulos, a special correspondent for the Los Angeles Times.

History
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Descendants Of Chinese Laborers Reclaim Railroad's History

A group of Asian-Americans, including descendants of Chinese railroad workers, recreated an iconic photo on the 145th anniversary of the first transcontinental railroad's completion at Promontory Summit, Utah.
Courtesy of Corky Lee

Originally published on Sat May 10, 2014 9:55 pm

East finally met West 145 years ago on America's first transcontinental railroad.

The symbolic hammering of a golden spike at Promontory Summit, Utah, completed the connection between the country's two coasts and shortened a cross-country trip of more than six months down to a week.

Much of the building was done by thousands of laborers brought in from China, but their faces were left out of photographs taken on that momentous day.

Over the years, one photograph in particular from May 10, 1869, has taken root in U.S. history.

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My Big Break
5:23 pm
Sat May 10, 2014

Dolphins, Pirates And David Hasselhoff: Breaking Into TV At Sea

While translating for Japanese tourists on a boat in Hawaii, Leah Warshawski learned about the ocean, knowledge she later used in film production.
Courtesy of Leah Warshawski

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Director and producer Leah Warshawski's big break happened on the water.

It started when she was in college studying Japanese in Hawaii. Her dormmate worked on a boat and asked if Warshawksi wanted a job translating for Japanese tourists.

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Education
6:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Under Restructured Rules, Kansas Teachers Lose Tenure

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

Kansas lawmakers have passed a bill to make it easier to fire teachers. The legislation will take away some of the employment protections offered to teachers. Supporters say school administrators need the flexibility to remove teachers who aren't performing, but as Kansas Public Radio's Stephen Koranda reports, teachers argue this will allow them to be fired for unfair reasons.

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Books
6:08 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

In A Changing Climate, Science Fiction Starts To Feel Real

cover detail
Courtesy Night Shade Books

Originally published on Mon May 12, 2014 4:17 pm

The White House released a report this week on the impacts of global warming. Many places are already feeling the effects. There's drought in the Southwest, rising sea levels in Miami, and now even fictional worlds are feeling the burn.

There have been novels about climate change since the 1960's, but to me the definitive example is a book that's not well known outside the field of science fiction: The Windup Girl, by the American novelist Paolo Bacigalupi, which won both the Hugo and the Nebula Awards in 2010.

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Movie Interviews
5:47 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

In 'God's Pocket,' There's A Mad Man Behind The Camera

John Slattery (left) reprises his role as Roger Sterling in the seventh and final season of Mad Men.
Frank Ockenfels Courtesy of AMC

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

The 1980s novel God's Pocket, by Pete Dexter, is a story of hapless drunks, construction workers and one washed-up newspaper columnist. The book takes its name from a fictional blue-collar neighborhood in Philadelphia.

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Shots - Health News
4:51 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Keep Or Kill Last Lab Stocks Of Smallpox? Time To Decide, Says WHO

U.S. Marine Sgt. Robert Scoggin gets a vaccination against smallpox in 2003 at Camp Pendleton in California — one of the final steps before deployment overseas.
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

The World Health Organization is revisiting a question that's been the subject of intense debate for decades: whether to destroy the only known samples of the smallpox virus.

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Africa
4:39 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Nigerian Kidnapping Highlights Scale Of Child Trafficking In Africa

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

Nearly 300 schoolgirls remain missing in Nigeria. For more information on the pervasiveness of child slavery in Africa, Robert Siegel speaks with Benjamin Lawrance, the Barber B. Conable Jr. Endowed Chair in International Studies at the Rochester Institute of Technology.

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Politics
4:31 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Faced With Pentagon Budget Cuts, Congress Finesses The Numbers

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

The Pentagon's congressionally-imposed budget cuts ran into a powerful opponent this week: Congress itself. The House Armed Services Committee rejected $5 billion worth of proposed cuts in order to preserve items cherished by individual lawmakers.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Sports
4:11 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Heisman Winner Slides In NFL Draft, Caught By Cleveland

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. This was an NFL draft party last night hosted by the sports radio station ESPN Cleveland.

UNIDENTIFIED MAN: With the 22nd pick in the 2014 NFL draft, the Cleveland Browns select Johnny Manziel.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING)

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Middle East
4:11 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

After Setbacks In Battle, Syrian Rebels Seek Victories In D.C.

Originally published on Fri May 9, 2014 8:45 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Around the Nation
4:11 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Federal Goverment Jeopardizes Navajo Family's Ties To Its Home

Navajo elder Stella Peshlakai Smith, 89, stands at a traditional dwelling on her homestead at Wupatki National Monument in 2014. The National Park Service says her children cannot stay when she dies.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Originally published on Sat May 17, 2014 10:46 am

At 89 years old, Stella Peshlakai Smith shuffles around her Arizona yard in white tennis shoes and a long traditional Navajo skirt. She points to her ceremonial home, called a hogan. "My father made this one [almost 100 years ago]," Smith says. Her modern house sits next door.

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Around the Nation
5:19 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

The Messy Legal Road That Led To Oklahoma's Botched Execution

Republican Gov. Mary Fallin of Oklahoma, here with Michael C. Thompson, state secretary of safety and security, charged that the state Supreme Court had exceeded its jurisdiction when it called for a stay of execution in the Clayton Lockett case in March.
Alonzo Adams AP

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 11:08 pm

Although most of the country just became aware of issues with Oklahoma's capital punishment protocols last week after Clayton Lockett's bungled execution, his lawyers had been worried for months. That's because in January, two condemned men in different states but injected with the same new drug cocktail endured executions that went badly. Lockett's lawyer, Susanna Gattoni, was unable to keep him from suffering a similar fate last week.

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Remembrances
4:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Remembering Author Farley Mowat, Who 'Wore His Kilt Dangerously'

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 7:49 pm

Canadian writer Farley Mowat has died at the age of 92. The prolific author published 45 books, perhaps the most popular of which was Never Cry Wolf. He is remembered by Doug Gibson, Mowat's publisher and longtime friend.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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Shots - Health News
4:54 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Mental Health 101: Program Helps Police Intervene In Crises

A police officer stands outside the entrance to Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Dec. 15, 2012.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 8:24 pm

How do you tell the difference between someone who needs to be taken to jail and someone who needs to be taken to the hospital? It can be a delicate situation to decipher, and it's been a big concern in Connecticut since the Newtown shootings of 2012.

Lance Newkirchen, a regular patrol officer in the town of Fairfield, is also specifically trained to respond to mental health calls. On a recent weekday, he headed out in his patrol car for a follow-up call.

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Television
4:16 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Let's Be Careful Out There: The Legacy Of 'Hill Street Blues'

Michael Conrad as Sgt. Phil Esterhaus does the cop roll call, concluding with his signature line: "Let's be careful out there."
NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 7:49 pm

This is the moment that launched a TV revolution, every week. The police roll call: Sgt. Phil Esterhaus faced his colleagues — a paternal, knowing grin on his face — while he ran down the day's advisories about a black male pickpocket wearing a blond wig and purple dress, or the need for officers to catch a rapist terrorizing their precinct.

"Let's spend a little less time flirting with the hookers and the waitresses and put some heavy attention on that park," Esterhaus told his patrolmen in one roll call, sparking laughter and feigned denials from the crowd.

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Shots - Health News
3:46 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Anti-Aging Hormone Could Make You Smarter

Klotho (right) is one of the three Greek Fates depicted in this Flemish tapestry at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London.
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Thu May 8, 2014 7:49 pm

A hormone associated with longevity also appears to make people's brains work better.

The finding in Cell Reports could someday lead to drugs that improve memory and learning, researchers say.

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