DREAMers

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

On Tuesday, a New York federal judge issued the second ruling to temporarily block the Trump administration from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, program on March 5.

Laura Benshoff / WHYY

After Sunday’s Super Bowl win, the Philadelphia Eagles have fully assumed the mantle of righteous underdogs.

Can that status resolve a so far intractable political fight over U.S. immigration law?

It’s unlikely, but that has not stopped several Dreamers and the city-based immigration rights group Juntos from asking the Birds to protest a legislative impasse over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program by boycotting a customary visit to the White House for Super Bowl winners.

Emma Lee / WHYY

About 4,000 DACA recipients who tried to renew their participation in the program before October 5, 2017 missed that deadline.

Some of those applications — no joke — got lost in the mail.

Twenty-six-year-old Osman Enriquez, a stone mason and construction worker in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, is one of them. Last week, that postal carrier snafu landed him in immigration detention.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

President Donald Trump plans to visit Harrisburg Wednesday to pitch his tax reform plan. 

Matt York / AP

Politicians and organizations in Philadelphia are raising money to help pay for applications to a soon-to be-ended program that allows young immigrants without legal status to remain in the country.

Officials on Monday announced the launch of The Dreamers Initiative , a fundraising effort to cover the $495 fee needed to renew an application to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals or DACA program.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP

Among Pittsburgh DREAMers who benefited from the Deferred Action for Children Arrivals program – also called DACA – the Trump administration's decision to end the program elicited reactions ranging from distress to resignation on Wednesday.

Some were at a loss, saying they have no way to ensure they can stay in the U.S. if DACA expires in six months without a replacement from Congress.

Kathleen J. Davis / 90.5 WESA

About 100 protesters gathered outside the Mt. Lebanon office of Rep. Tim Murphy Wednesday afternoon to protest President Donald Trump's decision to end the Deferred Action for Children's Arrivals program, commonly known as DACA.

Jacquelyn Martin / AP

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced on Tuesday that the Trump Administration will rescind the Deferred Action for Children Arrivals program – also called DACA – and allow legal protections for the roughly 800,000 “DREAMers,” who arrived in the country illegally as children, to expire in six months.

Unless Congress acts, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto said on Tuesday, ending DACA will hurt the city’s universities and hospitals as well as tech and other corporate employers.