George Romero

Virginia Alvino Young / 90.5 WESA

From the aroma of the food court to back-to-school shopping, everyone has memories of the shopping mall. But for Pittsburgh author Matthew Newton, the mall says much more about our society.

Deanna Garcia / 90.5 WESA

From alligator heads to zombie figurines, a half-hidden museum in Pittsburgh has amassed a unique collection of the macabre.  

Nothing seems unusual on the way to Trundle Manor in Swissvale. 

Gene J. Puskar / AP

George Romero, whose classic "Night of the Living Dead" and other horror films turned zombie movies into social commentaries and who saw his flesh-devouring undead spawn countless imitators, remakes and homages, has died. He was 77.

Library of Congress

It seemed like a typical low-budget horror flick, the kind being churned out by aspiring directors in the 1960s. The cost of production was only $150,000, shot on black and white film and crew members used Bosco chocolate syrup for blood.

And yet “Night of the Living Dead,” a movie made entirely in Pittsburgh with Pittsburgh-based actors, defied the odds and the critics to become a cult classic that has brought an entire zombie culture to life and made a profit well into the millions -- all that despite a rocky start.

A Passion For Brains

Oct 28, 2013
Flickr

Since the classic George Romero zombie film “Night of the Living Dead” grew in popularity, Pittsburgh has been a zombie town.

The 1968 horror flick was filmed just 30 miles from the city in Butler County, something many Pittsburgh zombie fans take pride in.

For Timothy Verstynen, assistant professor in psychology at CMU and the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, zombies are both a fascination and more interestingly, a teaching tool.