Human Rights

Martin Meissner / AP Photo

In 2014, a state task force was assembled to find out how many Pennsylvania schools teach its students about the Holocaust, genocide and human rights violations. Act 70 encouraged schools to teach about these subjects by providing free resources and training for teachers.

Three years later, the Pennsylvania Board of Education has found that 93 percent of public, charter and technical schools in the commonwealth reported some level of instruction on the topics. 

Megan Harris / 90.5 WESA

It's possible that Bret Grote gets more mail from state prison inmates than anyone else in Pittsburgh.

As the co-founder and legal director of the Abolitionist Law Center, he says he is “dedicated to the abolition of race- and class-based mass incarceration.”

The non-profit law firm provides legal services for people who are incarcerated.

Multidisciplinary Perspectives On Prolonged Solitary Confinement

Apr 14, 2016
J Miller / flickr

  Prisoners who spend prolonged periods in solitary confinement are susceptible to a number of mental health disorders. They can include anxiety, depression and paranoia. Much like post traumatic stress disorder effects of these health concerns can continue for a long time. We’ll address the issue of prolonged solitary confinement with Professor Jules Lobel of the Danish Institute for Human Rights, Professor Michael Zigmond, University of Pitt. Medical School and Shandre Delaney, an activist whose son is in solitary confinement.

Pittsburgh received the second highest grade in lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) equality among seven cities in Pennsylvania, according to a report released Wednesday by the Human Rights Campaign.

Pittsburgh scored a 90 out of a possible 100, which is based on the city’s non-discrimination laws, relationship recognition, employment policies, law enforcement and municipal leadership on matters of equality.

Eight state and local organizations are coming together to put the issue of human rights on the minds of Pittsburghers.

Demonstrators are expected to gather outside downtown’s City-County Building Tuesday on International Human Rights Day to call on City Council and Mayor-elect Bill Peduto to ensure Pittsburgh’s future as the 5th “Human Rights City” in the U.S.

In April 2011, City Council issued a proclamation declaring Pittsburgh to be a” Human Rights City”—meaning its citizens strive toward bettering the city’s living conditions.