National Partners

Stories from our program partners, including NPR, APM, and PRI.

TaskRabbit is what work will look like in the future, CEO says

Mar 16, 2017

Stacy Brown-Philpot took over as CEO at TaskRabbit less than a year ago. Today, she's announcing that the on-demand chore and handyman service will double the number of cities it operates in over the next six months. The first five include Cincinnati, Minneapolis, and Charlotte, North Carolina. Brown-Philpot also talks to host Kai Ryssdal about the changing nature of work and why she thinks working for companies like TaskRabbit is the future. 

 

Somebody's in McTrouble

Mar 16, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

McDonald’s official corporate Twitter account was "compromised" this morning when it sent a tweet insulting President Donald Trump, the company said.

“Twitter notified us that our account was compromised. We deleted the tweet, secured our account and are now investigating this,” a McDonald’s spokeswoman told Marketplace. The company later tweeted out the statement as well.

Why some say Fed interest rate hikes are premature

Mar 16, 2017
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

The Federal Reserve voted to increase interest rates by a quarter percentage point at its March meeting. It's signaling two more quarter-point rate hikes this year.

Fed Chair Janet Yellen said the economy is strong and ready for a rate hike. Inflation is closing in on the Fed’s target of 2 percent, and Yellen said the unemployment rate is continuing to fall. But some people say it’s premature to raise rates. 

How tech is finding its way into your beauty bag

Mar 16, 2017
Erika Beras

Tech has found its way into your beauty bag. Earlier this year, L'Oreal announced it's releasing a smart $200 hairbrush, which has a built-in microphone that listens to your brushing patterns to make sure you don’t overbrush. The vibrating brush also measures the force you're applying to the scalp. All of that connects to an app. It's like a Fitbit for your hair.

Rising car loan default rates spell trouble for automakers

Mar 16, 2017

People who took out subprime loans to buy a car are falling behind on their payments at the highest rate since the financial crisis. That could lead to higher costs for people who want a car loan. It’s also bad news for the automakers. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

High-end Toronto retailer Canada Goose is looking to raise at least $230 million with its IPO launch. Its product line is tiny, and the coyote fur-lined winter coat price tags are big, with some parkas going as high as $1,300. These are the challenges for luxury brands that go public. 

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Which areas will see cuts under Trump's budget?

Mar 16, 2017
Marketplace staff

The Trump administration's $1.15 trillion budget proposal for the upcoming year calls for reduced funding for the Environmental Protection Agency and a major boost for defense spending.

The biggest winner: those who favor a smaller government. The proposal, released today, dramatically cuts the size of the federal government, slashing budgets for many agencies and eliminating dozens of programs.

Marketplace

South by Southwest has kicked off in Austin, Texas, which has its own "Tech under Trump" programming. Marketplace's Molly Wood explains what the tech industry hopes to get out of it, and whether there are any aspects of the Trump administration that tech companies are excited about. Afterwards, we'll look at the unique songwriting process of Bombadil, a folk-pop trio based in North Carolina that's using data and algorithms to try and give fans more of what they want. 

Marketplace

With the release of the White House's budget proposal, we'll look at who gets the big money and who may end up facing big cuts. Next, we'll look at Janet Yellen's rationale for the Fed's interest rate hike, and then explore the rising number of people who are falling behind on subprime car loans.

A federal judge has blocked Trump's second travel ban

Mar 15, 2017
Marketplace

GREENBELT, Md. (AP) — Hours before it was to take effect, President Donald Trump's revised travel ban was put on hold Wednesday by a federal judge in Hawaii after hearing arguments that the executive order discriminates on the basis of nationality.

The ruling came as opponents renewed their legal challenges across the country, asking judges in three states to block the executive order that targets people from six predominantly Muslim countries.

Vanessa Rancano

At the Fresno County Jail, Sgt. Elisa Magallanes walked a newly arrested man from a holding cell to a small locked booth where she books him. She talked to him through a glass barrier with a small window in it.

“Where were you born at?” Magallanes asked. Mexico, he said.

“Are you a U.S. citizen?” He is, he said.

“I gotta give you this consent form,” she said, passing him a slip of paper. “It’s pertaining to ICE,” as in Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Is a border adjustment tax illegal?

Mar 15, 2017
Sabri Ben-Achour

The border adjustment tax is part of a larger tax reform bill that would allow U.S. exporters to deduct the cost of materials and wages when they do their taxes if they produce in the United States. Importers would not be allowed to deduct these costs, and when the math is done, it amounts to a 20 percent tax on imports, most economists say.

Is it illegal? There’s a strong, but not ironclad, argument that it is. 

Why ride sharing companies are absent from SXSW

Mar 15, 2017

One hundred fifty thousand people are descending on Austin, Texas, this week and next for the South by Southwest Conference and Festivals. Marketplace’s senior tech correspondent Molly Wood, who talked to host Kai Ryssdal from Austin, said this year, a lot of people are having a difficult time getting around.

Let's talk about the real monster in 'Get Out'

Mar 15, 2017
Kai Ryssdal

President Donald Trump has promised to take a tough line with China over bilateral trade. Now word comes that Chinese Premier Li Keqiang said at China’s National People’s Congress that China does not want a trade war, but that if it did happen, the U.S. could be hurt. Neither the U.S. nor China has taken significant steps to punish the other on trade since Trump took office. But if the U.S. were to impose punitive tariffs on Chinese imports, U.S.

President Donald Trump went to Detroit and said he was going to boost American automakers. By rolling back EPA fuel economy standards that President Barack Obama finalized right before he left office, Trump said the big car companies could make more money and hire more Americans. Tighter mileage and emissions standards were set to go into effect by 2025 and were a big part of Obama’s plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Janet Yellen's job explained in five questions

Mar 15, 2017
Jana Kasperkevic

Janet Yellen, chair of the Federal Reserve's Open Market Committee, took the stage this afternoon in Washington, D.C., to answer questions about the Fed's decision to raise interest rates for the third time since the 2008 financial crisis. 

US charges Russian officials, hackers in mass Yahoo breach

Mar 15, 2017
Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States announced charges Wednesday against two Russian intelligence officers and two hackers, accusing them of a mega data breach at Yahoo that affected at least a half billion user accounts.

The hack targeted the email accounts of Russian and U.S. officials, Russian journalists, and employees of financial services and other businesses, officials said.

03/15/2017: Take a (very small) hike

Mar 15, 2017
Marketplace

It's official: The Federal Reserve is raising interest rates by a quarter of a percentage point, with two more hikes expected this year. We'll talk through Chair Janet Yellen's announcement. Then: President Donald Trump's plan for a border adjustment tax seems like a straightforward enough way to encourage companies to buy American and hire American, but is it legal? Plus, the view from an Uber-less SXSW and the remarkable success of "Get Out."

With the Fed expected to hike interest rates today, will take a look at what the move could mean for your loans. Afterwards, we'll discuss how layoffs at the Alcoa aluminum plant in Wenatchee, Washington have led former employees to figure out their passions.

What do Trump's 2005 tax returns reveal?

Mar 15, 2017
Kim Adams

President Donald Trump has not released his taxes like his predecessors, but a tiny window is now open to the public. Longtime tax journalist David Cay Johnston got a hold of two pages from his 2005 tax return — which he says were sent to him through the U.S. Postal Service — and talked about them on MSNBC's "The Rachel Maddow Show" Tuesday night. 

How the Fed increasing interest rates affects you

Mar 15, 2017
Nancy Marshall-Genzer

Update (11:15 p.m.): The Federal Reserve is raising rates a quarter of a percentage point. Chair Janet Yellen announced the long-awaited hike, the third since the financial crisis, end of the Fed's two-day meeting Wednesday. The Fed has signaled it’ll boost rates two more times this year, increasing them by a total of three-quarters of a percentage point.

After years of super-low interest rates, consumers will now start feeling the pinch.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson begins a swing through Asia today. He’ll talk with leaders about the North Korean nuclear threat and bilateral trade deals. Tillerson’s first stop is Japan, where Prime Minister Shinzo Abe is preparing to combat the country’s shortage of skilled labor with a new proposal — free education for some students. This comes as Japan’s birth rate continues to dive.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Sometimes a layoff can lead to more happiness

Mar 15, 2017
Mitchell Hartman

Well-paid factory jobs producing primary metals such as steel and aluminum have been disappearing in the past several decades in the U.S.

What's next for Brexit?

Mar 15, 2017
Mark Garrison

The United Kingdom's Parliament has backed a law that will grant Prime Minister Theresa May the ability to leave the European Union. 

After the Queen signs it into law, May can trigger Article 50, officially beginning the process.

Marketplace

A single March Madness tournament bracket has 9.2 quintillion possible combinations. Luckily, people making wagers now have technology on their side. CNET's Lindsey Turrentine dropped by to discuss the different tools people can use to increase their odds of winning. Next, we'll talk about the downfall of shopping malls — a decline 20-some years in the making — and then look at an iPhone case by Esti Inc. that runs Android 7.1's operating system. 

03/15/17: What do Trump's 2005 tax returns reveal?

Mar 15, 2017
Marketplace

Pages from Trump's 2005 tax returns are out, revealing he made $153 million and paid $36.5 million in income taxes. We'll look at what else the documents revealed, like the tax loopholes he may have taken advantage of. In other Trump news, we'll also discuss his plans to roll back fuel economy standards for cars, which could be the latest blow for the green vehicle market. And finally, we'll look at what Britain's exit from the European Union will mean for the business community and the U.K.-U.S. relationship.

Conservative Iowa Congressman Steve King took aim at immigrants over the weekend when he tweeted, "We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies." But a reporter for Mother Jones magazine says his grandfather was one of those babies.

Six years after the Fukushima Daiichi meltdown, officials are still seeking ways to deal with the huge amount of hazardous waste being generated at the nuclear power plant.

Tokyo-based journalist James Simms has been covering the Fukushima cleanup since shortly after the effort was crippled by a tsunami in March 2011.

He told The World that six years on, there has been some progress toward decommissioning the plant, “but many unforeseen issues may mean that the cleanup and dismantling and decontamination will take longer than previously expected.”

Steven Davy

Every March in Austin, Texas, an explosion of technology entrepreneurs show off their latest ideas and hobnob at parties, tweeting, snapping and gramming epic stories about who they met and what they saw.

South by Southwest — referred to as SXSW — is known for the music and films that premiere here. But the weekend before the music is SXSW Interactive. It’s full of energy and deal-making.

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