NCAA

Becky Wetherington/Flickr

In commemoration of World Autism Awareness Day, Lu Randall, Executive Director at Autism Connection of PA and April Artz,Coordinator for the EmployAble program at the Squirrel Hill Career Development Center, are working to place adults with mental health issues in STEM jobs. The EmployAble program, which provides supportive services along with their job placements, acquired the funds to include services for adults on the autism spectrum in 2014.

Asked about the challenges faced by job seekers on the autism spectrum, Artz explains:

"When people go to apply for a job, there's still a lot of concern on their end about disclosing or talking about it to their employer. And I think in some ways that is justified because there is still a lot of misunderstanding despite the fact [that] this is very prevalent, and this is sort of being a human, we still have a lot of stigma and anxiety around this."

Explaining her outlook on helping the people she works with to seek employment, Randall says: 

"I see my role, in particular, as providing kind of a cross-cultural explanation of a group that's really not well understood. And it's very similar, when we listen to the issues, to any other minority groups in the past or currently who have a hard time being taken seriously, being respected, not having stereotypes put out there that are untrue."

Also in the program, Pitt professor Michael Kenney talks about why some Americans become interested in joining ISIS, and travel contributor Elaine Labalme gives suggestions on where to go for some extra March Madness.

 

Essential Pittsburgh: A Penn State Fraternity's Facebook Fallout

Mar 20, 2015
AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar

Two weeks after the Oklahoma State University fraternity scandal comes another. This time closer to home at Penn State where members of the Kappa Delta Rho fraternity are under investigation for a secret Facebook page containing nude photos, drug use and hazing. We get the latest on the investigation from Penn Live reporter Ivey DeJesus.

DeJesus outlined the points of comparison between the Oklahoma State fraternity scandal and the Penn State scandal, many of which revolved around the administrations' responses:

"Oklahoma University President David Boren came out immediately after the Sigma Alpha Epsilon matter broke. He spoke out and was very involved in it. I think people were waiting for [Penn State University President] Eric Barron to do the same." - Ivey DeJesus

Also in today's show, "Silence of the Lambs" director Jonathan Demme comes to town for the CMU International Film Festival, and Pitt Women's Basketball coach Suzie McConnell-Serio prepares to take her team to the NCAA Tournament.

Michael Lynch / 90.5 WESA

Despite not having a professional team, basketball is expected to bring big bucks to the city of Pittsburgh this weekend.

Tourism agency VisitPittsburgh projects as much as $7 million will be pumped into the local economy thanks to the NCAA Division I Men’s Basketball Championships at the Consol Energy Center on March 19 and 21.

Could a Pitt and Penn State Face-Off Be in the Works?

Dec 4, 2014

The University of Pittsburgh's first road win against the Miami Hurricanes in more than half a century has made the Panthers bowl eligible.

Some are speculating that it could lead to the first football game between Pitt and Penn State since 2000.

Veteran AP sports editor and journalist John Affleck, who was appointed in 2013 as Knight Chair at Penn State's John Curley Center for Sports Journalism, joins us to sort out the potential bowl game scenarios.

College sports' governing body says it is willing to let Pennsylvania control the $60 million fine Penn State is paying over its handling of the Jerry Sandusky molestation scandal.

The NCAA on Friday asked Commonwealth Court Judge Anne Covey to dismiss the lawsuit filed by Sen. Jake Corman and Treasurer Rob McCord.

The NCAA says that if Covey agrees, it also will move to end a federal lawsuit against McCord, Gov. Tom Corbett and others that challenges a 2013 state law requiring the money to remain within Pennsylvania.

The Penn State University (PSU) Board of Trustees will meet 8 a.m. Wednesday by phone to discuss a potential settlement of a lawsuit between state officials and the NCAA over the use of the $60 million fine PSU was ordered to pay in the wake of the Jerry Sandusky sex abuse scandal.

In 2012, PSU consented to a number of sanctions imposed by the NCAA in response to attempts by high-ranking university officials to hide Sandusky’s molestation of young boys. The consent decree included a $60 million fine to be used for programs for the protection of children.

Ed O’Bannon Ruling Means Big Changes for the NCAA

Aug 11, 2014
United States Courts

U.S. District Judge Claudia Ann Wilken has dealt a major blow to the NCAA's ideal of amateurism in college sports in her ruling of the Ed O'Bannon trial.

In a 99 page ruling, Judge Wilken wrote that "the Court will enjoin the NCAA from enforcing any rules or bylaws that would prohibit its member schools and conferences from offering (Division I-A) football or Division I basketball recruits a limited share of the revenues generated from the use of their names, images or likenesses in addition to a full grant-in-aid (scholarship)."

The Views Behind the Ed O' Bannon v. NCAA Antitrust Case

Jul 7, 2014
Credit Jeff Turner / Wikipedia Commons

After three long weeks, testimony has ended in the trial of Ed O'Bannon vs. the NCAA.

A decision in the case will likely come in August, following closing arguments in which each side argued whether the organization's rules prohibiting college athletes from profiting from their name, image and likeness, outweigh the alleged anti-competitive effects on Division I-A football and Division I basketball.

Brady McCollough, a Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporter who's been covering the case, said that the story begins with an NCAA basketball video game depicting players' likenesses, years after they had left college. Ed O' Bannon and the former marketing mastermind, Sonny Vaccaro decided to file a lawsuit against the NCAA for overstepping their boundaries and one of the arguments being made in the case is "student-athletes" are no longer students first.

Ben Gillin / Flickr

March Madness, Sweet 16, Elite Eight and Final Four are some pretty popular terms at this time of year. But legal infractions are a common problem for businesses that try to capitalize on all of the championship hype without looking at the copyright issues.

Dave Radack, vice chair of the Intellectual Property Department and member of Eckert Seamans' Board of Directors, works with patents, trademarks, copyrights and trade secrets.

The Pros and Cons of Unionizing College Athletics

Mar 28, 2014
AJ Guel / Flickr

The National Collegiate Athletic Association, commonly referred to as the NCAA, has argued for decades that giving student-athletes anything more than an education would be wrong.

But many former athletes and the National Labor Relations Board say that scholarship football players are employees with the right to unionize.

United Steel Workers Union President Leo Gerard says he understands why the players want to form a union.

March Madness = Academic Slump For Student-Athletes

Mar 10, 2014
Jeff Turner / Wikipedia Commons

Millions of tournament brackets, underdogs, perennial powerhouses, more than $1 billion and basketball make up the spectacle known as March Madness.  At this time of year, how much is the tournament taking away from student athlete's education?

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette Sportswriter Emeritus Bob Dvorchak says classroom time doesn’t seem to have the priority that it used to.

Penn State officials say they are gratified by the NCAA's decision to gradually restore football scholarships taken from the school following the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

President Rodney Erickson called the news particularly welcome to student athletes who want to attend Penn State "and will now have the means to do so."

College sports' governing body said Tuesday that the school has made significant changes to its athletics programs and cited the recommendation of former U.S. Sen. George Mitchell, who's been serving as the programs' integrity monitor.

The parents of a Slippery Rock University basketball player who died after an intense practice are suing the school and the National Collegiate Athletic Association, because their son wasn't screened for the sickle cell trait that contributed to his death and because school officials allegedly didn't do enough to help him after he collapsed.

The NCAA and Slippery Rock officials did not immediately return calls and emails seeking comment on the lawsuit filed by Jack and Cheryl Hill, of Roselle, N.J.

Dominic McDevit / Wikipedia

    

Former Pennsylvania Governor Dick Thornburgh feels former FBI director Louis Freeh's investigation of the Jerry Sandusky abuse case was not conclusively supported by evidence. The Penn State case marked the first time the NCAA punished an institution solely for transgressions related to a criminal matter.

The family of former coach Joe Paterno and other plaintiffs sued the NCAA last week, accusing the organization of intentionally defaming and commercially disparaging them through the imposition of sanctions against Penn State.

A federal judge on Thursday threw out the governor's lawsuit against the NCAA over sanctions against Penn State related to Jerry Sandusky, calling his argument "a Hail Mary pass" that easily warranted dismissal.

U.S. Middle District Judge Yvette Kane's decision puts an early end to the anti-trust lawsuit Gov. Tom Corbett filed in January in which he sought to overturn a $60 million fine, a four-year bowl ban, scholarship limits and other penalties.

If you win your basketball bracket pool at work, you might need that money to pay a fine — because it's illegal.

It might not be "madness," but a state lawmaker says it is "ridiculous" that filling out brackets for the NCAA basketball tournament in an office pool is still against the law in Pennsylvania.

Gov. Corbett has signed legislation that would require all proceeds from the 60 million dollars in NCAA fines paid by Penn State to be used exclusively in Pennsylvania.

Penn State agreed to pay the fines levied by the NCAA as a result of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse case.